heavy weather seamanship

When Chesapeake Bay Becomes a Hurricane Hole for a Ship

Instrument Panel Photo of Cruise Ship Carnival Pride during Hurricane Irene -- Photo courtesy of Bill Band

Instrument Panel Photo of Cruise Ship Carnival Pride during Hurricane Irene -- Photo courtesy of Bill Band

A fascinating blog entry yesterday on the Kadey-Krogen Yachts website recounts the Hurricane Irene experience of Chesapeake ship pilot Bill Band, father of Shannon Band, KKY’s marketing manager.  Band was one of two pilots who took the 960-foot Carnival Pride out of the Port of Baltimore and into the Bay to ride out the hurricane.  Just check out the wind-speed reading on the instrument display photo above, taken by Band during the storm.  Yikes.

It’s a fascinating story about modern ship handling and heavy weather strategy that should interest any captain who has wondered how he or she would fare at sea in a tropical cyclone.  The scale of everything in this story is larger than what most of us deal with every day, but many of the experiences hold similar in principle.

Have a look at the blog entry from Pilot Band on the Kadey-Krogen website.  There are some other impressive photos there, too.

If you were at sea during Irene, or any other major storm, we’d love to hear about your own experiences in the comments.

Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Cruising Under Power, seamanship
Photos — Hullish Weather on the North Atlantic

Photos — Hullish Weather on the North Atlantic

F/V Harvester showing her deep forefoot in rough Atlantic seas.

F/V Harvester showing her deep forefoot in rough Atlantic seas.

Let me say at the outset that it is NOT impossible for a semi-displacement, or even a planing hull to survive conditions like this. But I think it’s safe to say that it’s much less likely, while at the same time being MORE likely to induce a heart attack in the captain.  These photos were brought to my attention by the Nordhavn Dreamers Group on Yahoo, and a link posted there by one member. I would like to give credit to the photographer, but his/her identity is not established.

These are truly dramatic images and they show how even a 93-foot, deep displacement-hulled steel fishing trawler can have a “sporty ride” on the worst of the North Atlantic’s seas.  In fact, I’ve heard it said of some of these North Atlantic fishermen that they refer to the Discovery Channel’s “Deadliest Catch” cast as the “Deadliest Whiners.” Probably unfair, but pictures like this make it clear that ocean fishermen everywhere literally risk their lives for our seafood.

One of the images clearly shows the very deep forefoot of the hull and it’s obvious how much of this boat is below the waterline.  These are Scottish trawlers, built in Denmark and feature all the latest in fishing technology. Here’s a link to detailed descriptions of the boats. Enjoy the photos and if anyone knows who the photographer is, I will happily add the appropriate credit line.

Harvester heads down into a trough.

Harvester heads down into a trough.

Harvester about to head uphill in some wild seas.

Harvester about to head uphill in some wild seas.

Harvester almost disappears in the troughs.

Harvester almost disappears in the troughs.

Is this what they mean by a "beam sea?"

Is this what they mean by a "beam sea?"

Bottom paint looks okay from here.

Bottom paint looks okay from here.

"Captain wants a flybridge so he can see better."

"Captain wants a flybridge so he can see better."

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Construction & Technical, Environment & Weather