Larry Polster

Kadey-Krogen Notches 600th Yacht Sale

A new Krogen 44′ AE will start construction next month, the happy result of Kadey-Krogen Yachts’ 600th yacht sale. The customers of Kadey-Krogen sales executive Greg Kaufman were identified only as “two new members” of the KKY family of owners.  The yachts will be built at KKY’s construction partner, Asia Harbor Yacht Builders, in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, with delivery expected in the fall of 2015.

Kadey-Krogen 44' AE Yacht.  Photo:  Kadey-Krogen Yachts

Kadey-Krogen 44′ AE Yacht. Photo: Kadey-Krogen Yachts

The Krogen 44′ AE is the latest version of the company’s original 42′ design, which was penned by the late Jim Krogen for his business partner Art Kadey.  The “AE” designator was applied to Krogen 44′ yachts delivered as of 2011, which incorporated a set of more than 50 ergonomic and technical changes. The newest iteration includes a redesigned galley and expanded flybridge.

Here are the basic specs for the Krogen 44′ AE

Length Overall (LOA) 49′ 0″
Length On Deck (LOD) 44′ 4″
Length at Waterline (LWL) 40′ 11″
Beam (Molded) 15′ 6″
Beam (Over Rub Rail) 16′ 4″
Draft (Designed Water Line – DWL) 4′ 6″
Displacement (at DWL) 43,140 lb.
Ballast (Encapsulated Lead) 2,500 lb.
Fuel 850 gal.
Water 300 gal.

Range Performance (Approx., with 10% reserve)

6 knots: 4,450 Nautical Miles
7 knots: 3,000 Nautical Miles
8 knots: 1,900 Nautical Miles
9 knots: 1,250 Nautical Miles

All data from Kadey-Krogen Yachts.

For more detailed information and a nice photo gallery, see the KKY website.

Copyright © 2014 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

 

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Industry News, Powerboats
Victoria Allman Breaks-In a Trawler Galley

Victoria Allman Breaks-In a Trawler Galley

Chef/Author Victoria Allman in the Krogen 55' Expedition Galley -- Photo Courtesy of Kadey-Krogen

Chef/Author Victoria Allman in the Krogen 55' Expedition Galley -- Photo Courtesy of Kadey-Krogen

At last week’s Trawler Fest, our own favorite professional chef, Victoria Allman, treated a group of VIP guests of Kadey-Krogen to an evening of haute cuisine hors d’oeuvres (classy snacks).  For two evenings, Victoria gave the gorgeous galley aboard the Krogen 55′ Expedition a workout.  The Kadey-Krogen folks (author Shannon Band, actually) wrote about the show and the dining delights in their latest blog, which you can read here.  Kadey-Krogen recently upgraded the galley designs and you will now find seriously upscale features, such as Viking ranges and the like on new Kadey-Krogen yachts.

I’m planning to talk with Victoria about not only the Krogen 55′ Expedition galley, but about galley design aboard yachts in general.  As the chef aboard several megayachts for many years now, Victoria knows all about both the hardware and software (food) requirements for fine dining at sea.  If you’ve read her book, “Sea Fare, A Chef’s Journey Across the Ocean,” you know she’s a great storyteller with some delectable recipes.  In fact, Victoria just released her second book, “SEAsoned, A Chef’s Journey with Her Captain,” which complements more great recipes with the often-spicy tales of professional life aboard these megayachts.  I wonder if I’m too old to ship out?

Anyway, look for our talk with Victoria about yacht galley design here on OceanLines after we get back from the Miami International Boat Show, in two weeks.

Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Cruising Under Power, Cruising Under Sail, Gear & Apparel, megayachts, People, People & Profiles

The 50th Krogen 48′ Heralds an Ergonomic Makeover

View of the galley and salon of the Krogen 48' AE

View of the galley and salon of the Krogen 48' AE

Kadey-Krogen Yachts said yesterday that the 50th edition of its highly successful 48′ North Sea line is the first to sport a series of now-standard modifications that significantly improve liveability aboard a boat that was already highly regarded in the liveaboard community.  The company took the opportunity to re-badge the boat as the “Krogen 48′ AE,” the AE short for “Advanced Ergonomics.”  The changes include updates to the layouts of the salon, pilothouse and flybridge, as well as the incorporation of home-sized stairs and bannisters to ease movement through the boat.

I would like to tease the good-natured Larry Polster, Kadey-Krogen’s vice president, about how “Advanced” these ergonomic changes really are, but the truth is, in the cruising world they ARE advanced.  Not surprisingly, Kadey-Krogen collected the input from its customers to focus these updates on liveability — that somewhat undefined quality of making a boat easy to live aboard.

The Krogen 48′ North Sea has always been a favorite of long-distance cruisers, passagemakers and liveaboards.  The size seems to be a particular sweet spot for couples who want to live aboard and the boat holds its value extremely well.  A quick survey of Krogen 48′ models for sale on Yachtworld has even ten-year-old boats still well over the $700K mark, which means they really haven’t lost any value at all.

Back to the changes incorporated in the Krogen 48′ AE.  Here’s a brief list:

  • An option for an L- or U-shaped settee along the starboard side of the salon
  • A table that both expands and raises and lowers to serve as coffee table and dining table for eight.
  • A larger galley forward to starboard, with a now-standard Viking four-burner range, household size fridge/freezer, convection microwave, and room for both a trash compactor and dishwasher.
  • A nearly floor-to-ceiling pantry opposite the galley, on the port side.
  • New, deep and wide steps steps up to the pilothouse, with a sturdy bannister for security.
  • A redesigned pilothouse that accommodates side-by-side helm chairs and a larger electronics console (hooray!!).
  • New molded steps outside the portside pilothouse door up to the boat deck and flybridge.
  • Boat deck will accommodate both a 13-foot tender, as well as a summer kitchen.
  • The flybridge helm is now off to starboard, with an L-shape settee to port.

Kadey-Krogen is going through some of its other models just coming intro production now and making some of these same ergonomic changes, particularly to steps and stairs.  Does this kind of change exact a price in terms of space utilization? Of course. But the 48′ is big enough to handle the changes and the improvements in “liveability” are absolutely worth the price. If you’re going to live aboard one of these boats, the convenience and safety of actual human-sized stair treads and risers is more of a big deal than you might think.

For more pictures of the changes involved, check out the November blog entry of the Kadey-Krogen marketing team.  You can get a good feel for the new helm and flybridge arrangement in the pictures there.  You can check out the Krogen 48′ AE at Trawler Fest in Fort Lauderdale at the Bahia Mar January 27-29, and at the Miami International Boat Show (Sea Isle Marina location), from Febryary 17-21.

Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Powerboats
Video Debut: The Underway Series from OceanLines, Episode 1

Video Debut: The Underway Series from OceanLines, Episode 1

By way of introducing this new video series, let me re-state what will become obvious to you:  I am a writer. And writers may have great ideas for video but viewers will likely suffer a bit while the writer learns to be a filmmaker. And with that ugly excuse for the quality of our first effort here, let me introduce “The Underway Series” from OceanLines, which will document some of the routines of living and cruising offshore on a trawler or sailing vessel.  This first episode covers the “Periodic Engine Room Check” which all offshore cruisers should be doing, power or sail.

OceanLines Video - "The Underway Engine Room Check"

OceanLines Video - "The Underway Engine Room Check"

The philosophy behind an hourly, or every-two-hours engine-room check is that most big problems start out as small ones. And if they’re picked up early, many if not most, can be taken care of quickly and easily. Whether it’s a problem of the liquid outside the boat coming in — as in a leaking thru-hull or shaft seal; or one of the internal fluids — like oil, fuel or hydraulic fluid — leaking out of a component and into the boat, noticing it right away is key to offshore safety.

In the engine room, then, you will mainly be looking for leaks of the kinds just mentioned.  And as Gregg Gandy, project manager for Kadey-Krogen Yachts, and longtime yacht captain, demonstrates, a ritualized inspection will ensure you don’t miss anything.

This video was filmed during an offshore delivery of a new Krogen 58′ while more than 100 nm off the east coast of the U.S. Because our boat was brand new, with just enough time on the boat to be “broken in,” Captain Gandy was comfortable with a two-hour interval for the check. Some captains check every hour and a few go longer. I would say one or two hours is probably the right interval. Many owners these days will put a thermal imaging or even plain visible light camera in the engine room, fed to one of the helm displays.

You might consider creating and using a checklist at first. As pilots know, checklists are great for ensuring that distracting conditions don’t cause you to miss something critical. Another key, and you can see it in this video, is doing the inspection the same way every time.  Gregg likes to go to the far aft end of the engine room and work his way forward.

You can see him checking the running generator (we had two aboard the Krogen 58′) for leaks, vibration, loose belts or unusual noises. He then moves to the shafts, seals and transmissions, looking for proper cooling of the shafts, smooth, vibration-free turning of the shafts, no unexpected noise or vibration or movement from the transmissions.

While we may not have been able to get good voice quality in the engine room (remember to wear hearing protection, by the way), we will do so in future segments. Let us know in the comments what else you’d like to see.  I promise that we’ll keep them short and as interesting as possible.

Special thanks, by the way, to the folks at Kadey-Krogen Yachts — Larry Polster, Gregg Gandy and Greg Kaufman — who made this trip, and this video possible.

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Construction & Technical, Cruising Under Power, Cruising Under Sail, Engines, Maintenance & DIY, Passagemaking News, Powerboats, Sailboats, seamanship, Technology

A Closer Look at the New Krogen 52′

Stateroom with Office Accommodation Layout of new Kadey-Krogen 52"

Stateroom with Office Accommodation Layout of new Kadey-Krogen 52"

Kadey-Krogen’s recently announced 52′ is a classic example of a builder filling out a product line in specific response to customer demand. In this case, the company already had on offer its well-established 48′ and the new 55′ Expedition. The 55′ Expedition, however, is not really the “other” boat in this comparison — it’s the Krogen 58′ which was more of a model for the new 52′. In a recent interview, Kadey-Krogen Vice President Larry Polster talked about the boat itself and what kind of customer is the target for the new 52′.

With the first signs of the economic recovery beginning to emerge in the recreational boating industry, Kadey-Krogen is optimistic about the market for the new boat. “There’s clearly a market for bigger boats — upper 40s to mid-50s,” says Polster. He says the company originally had a hole in its lineup that stretched from the 48′ to the 58′ and originally started out designing a 53′. But input from the early customers on that design turned it into the 55′ Expedition, a significantly different design that the traditional Krogen. And the price wasn’t between the two original yachts, either.

Polster says the 52′ is better understood as a smaller 58′, rather than a larger 48′. And of course, he emphasizes, the new boat is designed fresh from the keel up. “It’s a purpose-built boat; not a stretched hull,” says Polster. The familial resemblance to the 58′ can be seen in details such as the Portuguese bridge, the Dutch door in the starboard-side galley, and the open office space below. So, the 52′ will appeal to those who like the design of the 58′ but might be intimidated either by the size or the price. And yet, it is substantially roomier than the 48′, not least because of the extra foot of beam (17′-9″).

Interestingly, all of the launch customers have chosen the same layout — master stateroom forward, twins to starboard, and a convertible open office to port. Kadey-Krogen has converted several of the initial letters of intent to firm contracts and construction is on schedule.

Starboard Profile Rendering of the new Krogen 52'

Starboard Profile Rendering of the new Krogen 52'

As a clean-sheet-of-paper design, the new 52′ is one of the few boats of her size that was designed from the outset for the baby boomers who started retiring last year. Manufacturers today — from the boat builders themselves to systems providers like KVH — understand that liveability aboard is key to success with the boomers. That liveability issue is directly related to keeping household standards. Not only do you see household-standard appliances and near-shore size beds and head fixtures, but even minor details like stair steps. “We’ve taken great pains to make all risers and treads house-standard,” says Polster. “The magic ratio is about 17 — rise plus run — but a tread of only 7″ is hard to stand on.”

Kadey-Krogen expects high efficiency from the 52’s hull. Predicted performance at a speed/length (s/l) ratio of 1.1 shows the requirement for 70 hp, moving the boat at 7.6 knots. The boat will displace 70,000 lbs at half-load. Standard engine is a 231 hp John Deere (all Krogens have JD power), and the genny will be a 12kW Northern Lights set.

The new 52′ has a competitive base price right now of $1.295 million. That compares to a base of $949K for the 48′ and $1.595 million for the 55′ Expedition.

One interesting side note: the question often arises — how big a boat do I need to live aboard? Obviously, there can’t be only one answer to that question, but in Kadey-Krogen’s experience, the answer is — “somewhere in the 40’s.” “We built 50 of the 39’s and as far as I know, only one couple lived aboard full-time,” says Polster. One size up, however, and it’s a different story. “The 42′ is a little bit longer, but a full 18″ wider in beam and tons of owners are full-time liveaboards.”

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Construction & Technical, Cruising Under Power, Engines, Industry News, Passagemaking News, People, Powerboats, Technology

More Details on New Krogen 52

Kadey-Krogen 52' Artist's Rendering

Kadey-Krogen 52' Artist's Rendering

Kadey-Krogen yesterday released more details of its newest trawler, the Krogen 52′, which we first reported on here. It’s decidedly a classic Krogen trawler, with its raised pilothouse and 3,000 nm range at about 7 knots. It shares many of the features of its bigger sister, the Krogen 58′. 

Main Deck Layout for the New Krogen 52'

Main Deck Layout for the New Krogen 52'

The main-deck galley is “Iron Chef”-equipped (my term) with a full-size Jennair fridge and a Viking range. It also has a weather-tight Dutch door with direct access to the starboard walkway. The stairs up to the pilothouse are on the portside and feature household-standard size risers and treads. The pilothouse on the 52′ accommodates dual helm chairs.

Accommodations Layout for the New Krogen 52'

Accommodations Layout for the New Krogen 52'

The yacht offers either a two- or three-cabin arrangement, with the master stateroom forward or amidships. Kadey-Krogen says those opting for a two-cabin arrangement will enjoy the utility of a large, dedicated office space. Both configurations include two heads with enclosed stall shower.

Midship Master Stateroom Layout for 3SR Version of New Krogen 52'

Midship Master Stateroom Layout for 3SR Version of New Krogen 52'

The company says the boat is being offered in both single- and twin-engine configurations. The hull design will feature Kadey-Krogen’s counter-faired keel, pioneered on the Krogen 58′, which imparts a counter-rotation to water flowing into the propeller, canceling some of the propeller-induced water rotation and resulting in straighter water outflow and improved forward thrust, which implies better fuel economy than that of conventional keel designs, according to Kadey-Krogen.

Midship Master Stateroom Layout for 2SR Version of New Krogen 52'

Midship Master Stateroom Layout for 2SR Version of New Krogen 52'

In the specs table below you can see that the engine options are from John Deere, with the single 6068AFM75 offering a continuous duty (M1) rating of 231 hp.  The company said tooling will be complete by late fall this year and first delivery is planned for summer 2011. The companysays it took a “more grassroots approach and contacted current owners to see if they were interested in the project,” says Larry Polster, vice president of Kadey-Krogen Yachts. “We also took a set of plans to Trawler Fest in Fort Lauderdale and within ten days of initial exposure, the first five hulls were reserved.”

Krogen 52’
Preliminary Specifications

Length on Deck:                                                 52’-2”
LOA (including swim platform):                       54’-4”                                                    
LOA (including swim platform & pulpit):        57’-0”
LWL:                                                                  47’-0”
Beam (molded):                                                  17’-3”
Beam (over rubrail):                                            17-9”
Beam (waterline):                                   16’-0”
Draft at Keel (half load, single eng): 5’-3”
Displacement (half load):                                    70,000 lb approx.
Fuel Capacity:                                                 1400 gal.
Water Capacity:                                               400 gal.
Top Speed (estimated):                                       9.5 knots (at Half Load)
Cruising Speed (estimated):                               8 knots (at Half Load)
Main Engine (single):                                          John Deere 6068AFM75 M1, Tier 2, 231hp @ 2300RPM
Main Engines (twin):                                          John Deere 4045TFM75 M2, Tier 2, 121hp @ 2500RPM
Reduction Gear (single engine):                        ZF Marine model ZF286 with 2.917:1 reduction
Reduction Gears (twin engine):                         ZF Marine model ZF220 with 3:1 reduction
Range at 7 knots (w/ 10% reserve)                    3000 nautical miles
Generator:                                                               (1) Northern Lights 12 kW, with sound shield
Ballast:                                                                   5300 lb approx.     
Base Price $1.295 million
   
Hydrostatic Data  
Displacement-to-length ratio                              301
Prismatic coefficient                                            .64
Pounds per Inch Immersion                               2700
Moment to Trim an Inch                                     7500 ft. lbs.

 

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Construction & Technical, Cruising Under Power, Engines, Industry News, Passagemaking News, Powerboats

Kadey-Krogen Unveils Updated Krogen 48′ North Sea

Expanded Galley Design on Krogen 48' North Sea -- Photo Courtesy of Kadey-Krogen Yachts

Expanded Galley Design on Krogen 48' North Sea -- Photo Courtesy of Kadey-Krogen Yachts

Kadey-Krogen Yachts recently announced that it has begun delivering an updated version of the venerable Krogen 48′ North Sea trawler. The boat was introduced in 1996, and like all boats, it has evolved and changed as a result of owner feedback and advancements in technology. Key changes to the Krogen 48′ are an enlarged galley and a redesigned flybridge.

Here’s the announcement from Kadey-Krogen:

Owner feedback was the driving force in changes made to the Krogen 48’ all of which enhance the liveability of the boat. The centerpiece of the newly enlarged galley on the Krogen 48’ is a four-burner Viking range. Household sized refrigeration is standard and there is room for a trash compactor and dishwasher as well. Stainless steel is standard on the appliances although traditional finishes are available. Kadey-Krogen also completely reengineered the flybridge. Instead of a centerline helm flanked by settees running fore and aft, the flybridge helm (with enough room for two helm chairs) is now off to starboard with an L-shaped settee to port that extends the entertainment space of the boat and makes cruising on the flybridge more comfortable for guests. The flybridge also has a summer kitchen, a feature that contributes to the boat’s self-sufficient capabilities and is popular with owners who entertain on the hook.

Larry Polster, vice president of Kadey-Krogen describes the Krogen 48’, “Our owners are the ones out there living the lifestyle so we trust that the feedback they provide will make our boats better for the next generation of Krogen owners. Though some of these changes are subtle, the latest 48’ North Sea is truly a reinvented classic.”

The second reinvented 48’ will be delivered to East Coast owners Will and Sue Parry who believe this boat will bring them full circle in their Kadey-Krogen experience. “This will be our fifth Kadey-Krogen trawler. The first was also a 48’ North Sea and shares the same name as we have given our new 48’, Second Star. We’ve owned four different models and the 48’ North Sea continues to be the vessel of our dreams.”

The first Krogen 48’ with the enlarged galley arrived in Seattle last fall. Her owners are now full time liveaboards but are graciously allowing the company to show off their new home at the Lake Union Boats Afloat show in Seattle, January 29-February 6. The second yacht with the enlarged galley arrived in the U.S. in December and is currently undergoing final commissioning. She will debut at the Ft. Lauderdale Trawler Fest Jan. 29-31 and exhibit at the Miami International Boat Show before she is delivered north to her owners in Annapolis.

To date, Kadey-Krogen has delivered 48 of the North Sea model, with hull #49 sold and under construction.

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC

Posted by Tom in Boats, Construction & Technical, Cruising Under Power, Industry News, Passagemaking News, Powerboats

10 Questions with Kadey-Krogen’s Larry Polster

 

Krogen 58 Cruises Among the Whales

Krogen 58 Cruises Among the Whales

Editor’s Note – In this series we feature a Q&A with the leading executives of passagemaking boat companies.  The second installment features the thoughts of Lary Polster, vice president of Kadey-Krogen, one of the top brands of passagemaking boats. The following bio was provided by Kadey-Krogen:

Larry Polster is a life-long boater, born and raised in Cleveland, OH. As a child he explored the Great Lakes from Mackinac Island to Montreal, and became thoroughly hooked on boating the day, at age 12, he piloted his family’s sedan cruiser the last half of their voyage from Kingston, Ontario, to Rochester, NY, because both mom and dad were too seasick to run the boat. Fast forward 25 years.  After ten years of owning a cruising sailboat, Larry and his wife Janet bought a Krogen 42′ – the beginning of Larry’s relationship with Kadey-Krogen Yachts. Then, completely in love with the Krogen 42′ and all it stood for, Larry volunteered to help out Kadey-Krogen at the Annapolis Boat Show. At the conclusion of the show, he was made an offer to come work for the company in Florida, an offer he graciously turned down. A seed was planted which grew into his mid-life crisis: he left his consulting job of 17 years and opened the Maryland office for Kadey-Krogen Yachts. A few years later he became a partner in the company and currently serves as vice president.  Larry and Janet along with their daughter Hannah and their Portuguese Water Dog, Sasha (the office mascot), reside in Annapolis, MD.

The questions asked are all from OceanLines and the answers from Larry Polster are verbatim.

———-

1.   OceanLines:  Kadey-Krogen is considered to be among the top couple of full-displacement yacht builders in the industry.  When did the company really begin to gel and succeed in the marketplace?  And was there a particular boat that represented that “turning point?”

Polster:   The Krogen 42’ is what started it all and we built 206 of them from 1977 through 1997.  The Krogen 42’ became immensely popular in the mid-80’s and I think that secured the company’s place in the industry.  There was also a second turning point with the launch of the first Krogen 58’ in 2000.  It was the 58 project that was the impetus for the level of refinement, both in equipment as well as fit and finish, that is found in each and every Kadey-Krogen built today.

2. OceanLines:  What, in your mind, defines the Kadey-Krogen “brand?”  In other words, what is it about Kadey-Krogen that customers and boaters think, that they don’t think about other brands?” 

Polster:  Actually Tom, I think that really is two different questions.  The “brand” can be summed up in four words:  Capability, Liveability, Family and Value.  As for what our owners think, or more importantly know, about Kadey-Krogen, is that we represent a full and complete package – from the initial handshake to the inevitable sale when the owners are ready to move on.  Look on YachtWorld at the huge percentage of our yachts that are listed with us and then look at other brands.  Our owners stick with us and that speaks volumes.  Yes, there are those out there that are capable of crossing oceans and a motoryacht can make a great liveaboard, but only a Kadey-Krogen is At Home on Any Sea.

3.   OceanLines:  Like many other builders in recent years, Kadey-Krogen seems to have concentrated on expanding the larger end of its fleet.  Do you think this represents a shift of the early market away from smaller boats in general or just an expansion?  In other words, is there still a good market for the smallest boats in this market segment of liveaboards and serious cruisers?

Polster:  There is definitely a market for the 40-50 foot trawler.  Our expansion on the larger end has been purely to fill in size gaps with vessels that can be handled by a couple.  We had nothing between 48 and 58 feet, hence the 55, and we had nothing larger than the 58, hence the 64’ Expedition.  Other builders are expanding way beyond 65’ but anything beyond the mid-sixties really requires more than two people and until you get near 100 feet, you don’t have proper space for crew.  Perhaps that is why there are such a relatively high number of large, late-model trawlers for sale.  Getting back to the 40-50 foot market, if you closely exam the Krogen 48’ North Sea you will notice that we put a tremendous amount of effort in bringing a proven model into the 21st century.

4.      OceanLines:  Has Kadey-Krogen looked at some of the latest technology developments, such as the various forms of diesel-electric propulsion, or perhaps newer hull designs such as the cat SWATH hulls?  If so, what is the likelihood some of it will make its way aboard some future (or present) Kadey-Krogen yachts?

Polster:  If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.  The laws of physics and hydrodynamics have not changed.  We feel our efforts are better concentrated on continued improvements with proven materials and equipment. 

Krogen 64 Artist's Rendering

Krogen 64 Artist's Rendering

5.    OceanLines:  You recently announced the availability of the Krogen 64’ Expedition.  While the economy is certainly affecting all new boat builders, is it possible Kadey-Krogen might offer even larger yachts, perhaps in the same Expedition series as the 55’ and 64’?

Polster:  Possible, yes, likely, no.   We have a design for a beautiful 77 footer that would extend the Expedition series, but we build yachts that a couple can handle with ease and confidence. A 77 footer would push those limits for most couples.

6.     OceanLines:  In your opinion, which systems aboard today’s yachts are the most mature and reliable; and which are the least so?  If you could send a message to systems suppliers to Kadey-Krogen yachts, what would it be?

Polster:  To me, hands down, the most mature and reliable is the modern diesel engine like the 6.8 liter John Deere.  Here is a piece of equipment with parts moving roughly 1800 times per minute.  That’s 108,000 times per hour of operation which means parts will move 216 million times before the factory warranty even expires! 

As for less reliable systems, there are certainly items that one is more likely to replace than others, but that does not make it an inferior product or something a supplier needs to work on and I think that any builder that concentrates on quality will say the same thing.  The overwhelming majority of the components have their origin outside of the recreational marine or yacht market and as such are well proven before we ever see them.

7.    OceanLines:  What features do Kadey-Krogen owners most often point to as influencing their decision to purchase a Kadey-Krogen yacht?

Polster:  The liveability of a Kadey-Krogen is well recognized by the cruising community, but the way a Kadey-Krogen handles at sea, especially in a following sea, is what cements the relationship.  Other trawlers either get pushed around, slalom like a snow ski or water ski on edge, or both in following seas because the aft third of their underbody is relatively flat and the entire beam of their transom is in the water.  Our Pure Full Displacement hull form with fine entry and wineglass stern translate into what I call the “magic carpet ride” in following seas.  The boat feels like it is hovering in place, but in reality is tracking forward as if on rails. 

Krogen 48, A Popular Liveaboard Cruiser

Krogen 48, A Popular Liveaboard Cruiser

8.     OceanLines:  Are there some examples of owner-requested features aboard your yachts that have become standard?

Polster:  We are a limited production builder, and as such have the opportunity to sit with each customer and review personal touches.  Most recently it was the Viking range you may have seen in the Krogen 55’ Expedition and Krogen 58.  A couple was moving up from a Krogen 44’ to a Krogen 48’ and they asked if we could fit in the Viking.  After a design review session with our naval architect, voila, the Viking stove is now standard aboard the 48’ North Sea.

9.    OceanLines:  Some of the builders in the “small boat” market have done a good job of bringing new boaters in at the bottom end of their product lines and keeping them as they upgrade through the fleet to larger and larger vessels.  Do you see a way for a trawler builder to do this, both from a size and price perspective?

Polster:  Yes, although we feel it’s more important to keep them in the “family” which is why some Krogen owners are buying smaller, not larger.  In the past eighteen months we have had four sets of owners in the “multiple” category.  One couple purchased their 4th Krogen, another their 5th and still another their 6th Krogen. 

10.   OceanLines:  Are you still satisfied with having Kadey-Krogen yachts built in East Asia?  Do you see possibilities down the road for builders like yourselves to take advantage of some of the emerging capabilities in places like Turkey and Poland?

Polster:  We have a very special relationship with Mr. Lin Kao Shui and Asia Harbor Yacht Builders.  We have been building at Asia Harbor for 18 years.   They only build for us and we only build at Asia Harbor.  Both companies have worked hard to produce the quality yachts that are Kadey-Krogen today.  As you might suspect from answers to some of the earlier questions, we’re not about to jump on the “greatest thing since sliced bread” bandwagon.  Over the past ten years we have seen many companies leave Taiwan only to return upon realizing that the grass is not greener…

11.   OceanLines:  In the last 18 months, most builders in your market space have introduced new models based upon an existing hull.  Kadey-Krogen has not.  Why?

Polster:  We’ve jokingly dubbed this phenomenon the “stretch-a-boat” concept.  In the last 18 months we have seen notable manufacturers stretch a 41-footer to be a 49-footer, a 47-footer to a 52-footer, and a 55-footer to a 60-footer. They have taken existing models and just inserted five to eight feet into the mold and voila, they have a new hull without significant design, engineering and tooling costs.  The problem is they have ignored architectural integrity, something Kadey-Krogen Yachts will not do.

12.   OceanLines:  Architectural integrity is not a concept that has received much attention.  Would you please explain what you mean?

Polster:  You are correct.  It has not received much attention because it only became an issue in the recreational yacht market very recently as builders started stretching boats in order to save development costs.  Perhaps the best-known example of violating architectural integrity occurred back when SUVs first became all the rage. Manufacturers simply took the chassis of another vehicle and put a large boxy structure on top, thereby raising the center of gravity. Remember all those early stories about SUVs rolling over?

Do I think these stretched models are going to roll over the way those early SUVs did?  Certainly not, but when a naval architect designs a boat, the hull is designed to accomplish a set of goals.  Designing a new boat is not done piece-meal and many decisions and measurements affect multiple characteristics.   If you take a boat and stretch it, the engineering is changed. You simply can’t design the proper curvature and shape of a hull, then stretch the middle by 10% or more, or stick a larger cockpit on it, and have the physics stay the same. You can’t, using sound naval architecture principles, place the propellers, rudders, etc. on a boat and then change its length by 10-15% and add a larger engine and prop, and expect the same handling result.   Take a sea trial, preferably on a really rough day. Insist on turning off the stabilizers and hand steering the boat in all conditions and you’ll see what I mean.

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Copyright © 2009 by OceanLines LLC

Posted by Tom in Boats, Construction & Technical, Cruising Under Power, Industry News, Passagemaking News, People, People & Profiles

Let’s Outfit the Helm of the new Kadey-Krogen 55′ Expedition

Kadey-Krogen 55' Expedition Helm

The helm of the new Kadey-Krogen 55 Expedition Awaits Outfitting

On Monday, February 2, 2009, OceanLines will publish the first in a unique series of articles intended to demonstrate the current state-of-the-art of passagemaking-level marine electronics.  We have been working with Kadey-Krogen Yachts and its vice president, Larry Polster, to demonstrate how each of four of the top marine electronics companies would outfit the newest Kadey-Krogen Yacht — the 55′ Expedition, which just arrived here in the U.S. and made its public debut at the Stuart Trawlerfest last weekend.  The 55 Expedition will be on prominent display at the upcoming Miami International Boatshow.

For this series, we asked Furuno, Garmin, Raymarine and Simrad to give us their recommendations, based on a fictional Request For Proposal (RFP) from a a fictional couple just acquiring their new 55 Expedition.  The RFP — which you can read in detail HERE — discusses the couple’s cruising plans, their general preferences in equipment, and the specific capabilities they require from the new electronics installed on board.

In order to help the marine electronics OEMs, Kadey-Krogen provided detailed drawings and specifications on the 55 Expedition, converting CAD files directly from the design into more portable document formats.  The OEMs were each given the RFP and the boat documentation early this month and they have responded with their recommendations and rationale.  Beginning Monday, we will present each individual response — one at a time, each day next week, concluding on Friday with a wrap-up and analysis of the series.

So, have a good look at this pristine helm station onboard one of the newest passagemaking yachts available and come back on Monday to see how Garmin proposes our fictional couple outfit the helm.

Copyright ©  2009 by OceanLines LLC

Posted by Tom in Boats, Technology