Pacific Asian Enterprises

First Nordhavn 63 Performance Data

First Nordhavn 63, named Silver Spray -- Photo by Owner, Courtesy of PAE

First Nordhavn 63, named Silver Spray -- Photo by Owner, Courtesy of PAE

Pacific Asian Enterprises, Inc., yesterday released the first published performance data for the new Nordhavn 63.  The data are from the first hull, Silver Spray, which was just delivered to its owner at PAE’s Stuart, Florida commissioning facility.  As you can see in the accompanying photo above, taken by the yacht’s owner, the N63 truly looks like the “next-generation” N62, the aft-pilothouse trawler that was a customer and fan favorite all through its production run.  PAE has a lot riding on this yacht and it could become the right model to help bring the next generation of luxury distance-cruising boaters to the brand.  It’s large enough to accommodate truly sumptuous appointments, yet small enough to be easily handled by a couple without crew.

The First Nordhavn 63, Silver Spray -- Photo Courtesy of PAE

The First Nordhavn 63, Silver Spray -- Photo Courtesy of PAE

In the table below, you can see that the sweet spot for cruising will be a little more than 8 knots.  The fuel consumption basically doubles from 8.1 knots to 9.30 knots.  And of course, as with nearly every other hull like this, if you slow down you get better range.  Here you can see the NMPG at 7.55 knots is 1.42, which is very good performance for a yacht that displaces about 143,000 lbs.

The N63 hull incorporates an interesting design detail called a “maintenance strake.”  We wrote about it here.

You can download the complete performance data sheet here.

Here is a link to the Nordhavn 63 webpage for full specs and information.

 Nordhavn 63 Cruise Performance Data

RPM KNOTS GPH NMPG % Load
1216 7.55 5.30 1.42 41
1314 8.10 6.70 1.21 48
1597 9.30 12.70 0.73 75
1706 9.50 14.85 0.64 88
1803 9.80 17.05 0.57 100


*Performance based on average of 2 reciprocal-course runs.  Data from Nordhavn 6301, equipped with a single Lugger 1276, and a 5-bladed 42″ x 29.5″ P Hung Shen prop.

Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power

Nordhavn 120 Passes Construction Milestone — Photos

Pacific Asian Enterprises, Inc., reports the joining of pilothouse and deck to the hull of N120-01, a major milestone in the assembly of the first Nordhavn megayacht.  There is still a long way to go as the company and its construction partner begin to stuff the hull with systems and accommodations, but for the first time you get a real sense of the actual yacht.  Herewith, the photos, courtesy of P.A.E.

First Photo of the Nordhavn 120 with hull, deck and pilothouse joined.  Photo: P.A.E.

First Photo of the Nordhavn 120 with hull, deck and pilothouse joined. Photo: P.A.E.

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First Photos of the Nordhavn 120 with hull, deck and pilothouse joined.  Photo: P.A.E.

First Photos of the Nordhavn 120 with hull, deck and pilothouse joined. Photo: P.A.E.

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First Photos of the Nordhavn 120 with hull, deck and pilothouse joined.  Photo: P.A.E.

First Photos of the Nordhavn 120 with hull, deck and pilothouse joined. Photo: P.A.E.

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Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Construction & Technical, megayachts

PAE Reports Build Progress on First Nordhavn 120

Latest exterior rendering of the new Nordhavn 120 under construction -- Courtesy of P.A.E.

Latest exterior rendering of the new Nordhavn 120 under construction -- Courtesy of P.A.E.

Pacific Asian Enterprises, Inc., said last night that progress continues with the build process on its first true superyacht, the Nordhavn 120.  According to the company, the hull and deck are joined, while the engine beds have been made and are ready for installation of the main engines (twin MTU 8V 2000 M72’s, rated at 965 HP at 2,250 RPM).  The company also provided these new renderings of the exterior and stateroom and salon.

Updated rendering of stateroom on the new Nordhavn 120 - Courtesy of P.A.E.

Updated rendering of stateroom on the new Nordhavn 120 - Courtesy of P.A.E.

Delivery is scheduled for mid-2012, which is about as specific as you can be more than a year out from the milestone.  A new interior designer has been chosen for hull number one.  PAE said,

Destry Darr has been commissioned to develop a high-end custom interior for hull one. The look will be simple and elegant yet contemporary in its styling. African cherry has been selected as the primary hardwood to be used throughout.

Updated rendering of the salon on the new Nordhavn 120 - Courtesy of P.A.E.

Updated rendering of the salon on the new Nordhavn 120 - Courtesy of P.A.E.

The N120, when delivered, will supplant the N86 as the queen of the 16-yacht Nordhavn fleet, with a cool 80 feet between the smallest and largest member.  The N120 is ABS-classed and designed and built to be certified to any international classification chosen by a buyer.  Classification decisions by an owner normally depend on the intended use of the yacht (charter vs. private use) and may be dictated in some cases by an owner’s insurance company.  Formal classification can involve a relatively significant expense to an owner, mainly due to the constant inspections and reviews required during the construction process, but as the size of the yacht increases, the cost as a percentage of the overall build declines and may be worthwhile in any event if the yacht is to be chartered.

You can read our earlier coverage of the Nordhavn 120 here.

A quick reminder of the N120 specs:

LOA:                                                   120’ 7”
LWL:                                                   108’ 4”
BEAM:                                                27’ 11”
BWL:                                                  27’ 10 ½”
DRAFT (FULL LD):                          9’
DISPLACEMENT (HALF):              740,992 lbs.
DISPLACEMENT (FULL):              848,994 lbs.
DISPLACEMENT (EMPTY):          668,890 lbs.
CP:                                                     .57
D/L (HALF)                                        251
A/B:                                                     2.25/1
WATER:                                             2,800 GALS.
FUEL:                                                 17,500 GALS.
BLACK WATER:                              300 GALS.
GRAY WATER                                 300 GALS.

Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Construction & Technical, Cruising Under Power, megayachts, Powerboats

What Would YOU Do With this Nordhavn 63 Helm?

The folks at Pacific Asian Enterprises just recently unloaded N63-01 from its freighter in Miami and brought it up to the Stuart completion center.  It’s a beautiful boat; an evolution of the N55/60 hull with the aft pilothouse and overall look of the venerable N62 (but not quite the beam of that boat).  In looking at the pictures P.A.E. posted on the Nordhavn brand website, I was drooling over the huge blank canvas of a dash in front of the helm and, naturally, I began to fantasize about what I would do if it was mine to outfit.

Helm of New Nordhavn 63-01 Before Electronics Installation.  Photo courtesy of P.A.E.

Helm of New Nordhavn 63-01 Before Electronics Installation. Photo courtesy of P.A.E.

Take a look at the photo above and imagine your favorite marine electronics installed in that non-glare acreage.  It occurred to me that you could put a 32″ HDTV in that slot and use the latest Picture-in-Picture (PIP) controls to split the screen with whatever secondary input you want.  On the other hand, one large screen like that means a single-point failure is going to be more of a pain in the rear.  So, typical design philosophy says we should split that area into two large displays.

Wide View of the Pilothouse Aboard the New Nordhavn 63

Wide View of the Pilothouse Aboard the New Nordhavn 63

I know I would prefer a black-box solution, with the displays fully customizable and redundant.  If you really want to go the full belt and suspenders route, you could probably put a multifunction chartplotter/display on the far left side of the dash.  In fact, since most owners of yachts this size will have two radars aboard, you could run the secondary radar as part of the chartplotter setup and use the primary radar on the main displays via black-box processor.

Salon Looking Forward Aboard New Nordhavn 63-01

Salon Looking Forward Aboard New Nordhavn 63-01

I’d love to hear your own thoughts and ideas in the comments.

Galley Aboard the New Nordhavn 63-01

Galley Aboard the New Nordhavn 63-01

In the other photos in this piece, all courtesy of PAE, you can see there is quite a bit of room to spread out and relax in this pilothouse, as well as a beautiful salon and galley below.  Delivery of N63-01 is set for a couple of months from now.  We did a piece a while back on an interesting design feature of the hull of this Nordhavn here on OceanLines.

Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Construction & Technical, Cruising Under Power, Electronics, Powerboats
Nordhavn 76 “Eliana” Delivered

Nordhavn 76 “Eliana” Delivered

 
 
 

 

Nordhavn 76 Eliana at Delivery in 2010

Nordhavn 76 Eliana at Delivery in 2010. Photo by Stephen Cridland

Editor’s Note — I’m running the full text here of a release this week from Pacific Asian Enterprises, the parent of the Nordhavn brand, in which they announce the recent delivery of “Eliana,” the 17th in the hull series.   I don’t normally run the full copy of press releases here on OceanLines, but this is a pretty good story, well-told; even if we have to forgive PAE for a little marketing hype. They’re good people and justifiably proud of this delivery.  Read on, dear reader…

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A few weeks ago, Nordhavn 76#17 Eliana was delivered to its owners Rick and Debbie Heiniger. The yacht is a portrait in contemporary styling and mechanical design savvy, and features a number of Nordhavn firsts on both fronts.

Prior to Eliana, the Heinigers had never owned a boat, but they approached the build and décor with the confidence and know-how of experienced yacht owners. The boat will become their full-time residence so they needed it to feel and function like a home. “We felt our design goal should emphasize a calm, serene and comfortable environment where one would love to spend time,” said Rick Heiniger. “Beauty would then be more of a feeling than an appearance.” The end result is what many have called the most exquisite Nordhavn 76 produced to date.

Designer Scott Cole certainly concurs with that description. “I am most proud of this interior of all the Nordhavns I’ve done,” said Cole. That’s high praise coming from the man who has helped create a number of gorgeous Nordhavn interiors. The Heinigers linked up with Cole and his firm, Seattle-based Ardeo Design, shortly after signing the contract for the N76 in 2008. From that point on, all parties were on the same page, and according to Cole, that chemistry was crucial toward the final outcome. “This boat is one of the best because everything just fell into place. The owners had good ideas of their own, were receptive to ideas, and made themselves accessible. They were appreciative of the entire process.”

Cole also attributes Debbie Heiniger’s great eye for style and her faith in her choices. The only time it wavered was in the beginning when the Heinigers, intent on creating a more traditional look for their yacht, saw another Nordhavn 76 whose interior had a modern feel. “After they saw the contemporary look of that 76, their minds changed.” The result? A combination of the two interiors; Elianaembodies the clean lines of the contemporary boat mixed with the warm African Cherry wood used in some traditional Nordhavns. The couple hail from Missouri and wanted to make sure the boat remained welcoming as well as sophisticated.

Salon Interior of Nordhavn 76-17 Eliana at Delivery in 2010

Salon Interior of Nordhavn 76-17 Eliana at Delivery in 2010. Photo by Stephen Cridland

The hardwood plays a key role in the spirit of the boat, and is a showcase of the Ta Shing yacht yard’s well-known excellent joinerwork, fit and finish. Incorporating the warm tones was critical in keeping the welcome feel, said Cole. The medium-toned quarter-sawn African Cherry is the primary wood and was used to construct the majority of the cabinets, as well as the walls’ wainscot, doors, and wood floors. The key to making the look contemporary was the couple’s decision to set the wood grain horizontally, which the craftsmen at Ta Shing executed masterfully. Adding a further contemporary nod, Cole suggested employing a mixture of woods and incorporated a darker wood, Charco, to use for the beds, nightstands, end tables and the dining table (the tops of the wood cabinets are Anigre.) The sprinkling of Charco wood was a way to introduce modern elements, simply within the woodwork itself. It easily transitions into the contemporary elements of the boat and disperses the oneness of all the African Cherry. Adds Cole: “It gives you the feel of loose furniture and breaks up the color palette. Combined with the other textural materials and finishes, they culminate to create a rich, casual elegance.” The touches of dark wood are present throughout the interior and provide a cohesive feel no matter where you go in the boat. This sustainable wood is FSC, SGS, and OLB- certified, and an example of Nordhavn’s efforts toward including green building practices.

Setting off the wood perfectly is the highly textural woven wall covering, which creates a lighter ambiance. Not many Nordhavns have wall covering, but the feature elevates Eliana’sstyle to a new level. As do the boat’s four heads. The master head is as luxurious as one would expect with stunning marble countertop, marble and glass accent tiles throughout, modern Toto satin nickel fixtures and a thoughtfully designed lighting plan. Venture to the two guest heads or the day head in the pilothouse and you’ll see the same fit and finish. “The guest heads and showers are finished to the same level as the master shower,” says Cole. “The owners’ keen eye for detail and willingness to upgrade these areas really made the interior cohesive.”

Behind the achievement of the interior aesthetic are a number of technical triumphs; of note, the design and implementation of a retractable awning extension over the cockpit. There are several eating and relaxing areas throughout the boat, but the simple addition of the accordion-like awning transforms the huge cockpit into a viable and pleasant space even in direct sun.

Another coup for the Heinigers is the design of a wheel-less helm. Only one other Nordhavn has been built without any sort of wheel present. “Esthetically, the helm layout is uncluttered and intuitive owing much of the efficiency to the absence of the destroyer wheel,” said Rick. The look is streamlined and seemingly practical, so why is the wheel-less helm so rare? Nearly all boats manufactured today are steered with joysticks while the boat is on autopilot, but when autopilot is turned off, for instance during docking, boat owners still want the familiarity of the ship’s wheel, says N76 Project Manager Garrett Severen. “On a Nordhavn, it is 14 revolutions from hard over port to hard over starboard, so docking with the lever control is much easier,” said Severen. “It’s like playing a video game.”

Nearly two years of construction and outfitting yielded Elianaa showstopper and shows just the level of sophistication that Nordhavns have reached. She’s a reliable, comfortable, state-of-the-art yacht that will provide enjoyable cruising and a safe haven for the Heinigers, no matter which place they happen to be calling home.”

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reprinted from press material supplied by Pacific Asian Enterprises.

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Powerboats

First Two Nordhavn 75 EYFs Meet in Cabo

Nordhavn 75 EYFs 1 and 2 Meet in Cabo -- Photo Courtesy of P.A.E.

Nordhavn 75 EYFs 1 and 2 Meet in Cabo -- Photo Courtesy of P.A.E.

There’s a great little item on the P.A.E. Nordhavn website about a chance meeting of the first two 75 Expedition Yacht Fisher (EYF) boats in Cabo San Lucas this summer. The two families who own hulls no. 1 and 2 apparently read the marketing materials that P.A.E. produced when it launched the new model.  One family is using their 75 EYF to explore, while the other boat is a serious offshore fishing boat.  Shall we vote on which color we like best?  I think they’re both nice, but for MY 75 EYF I’m going to choose a dark blue. You?

Here’s an excerpt from the P.A.E. post, which is worth a visit to read in its entirety:

“Of course, Cabo’s not so big that the two huge, uniquely beautiful Nordhavn Yacht Fishers could escape without crossing each other’s paths. They didn’t, and it was a remarkable sight, indeed, to see them – for the very first time since they were on stands at the factory in China – sitting side by side. Save for the paint color and a few variations, the boats were identical. You’d never guess the different personalities each possessed – one, host to family vacation getaways; the other, a gateway to fishing nirvana.”

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Passagemaking News, Powerboats
A Bigger Motorsailer from Nordhavn?

A Bigger Motorsailer from Nordhavn?

Partial Profile of a Possible Nordhavn 68 Motorsailer

Partial Profile of a Possible Nordhavn 68 Motorsailer

Pacific Asian Enterprises, the company that builds the Nordhavn line of passagemaking boats, has spent some of the less-pressured time of the economic recession to finish work on a couple of new designs.  Among them reportedly are a larger version of the 75 Expedition Yacht Fisher, a megayacht even bigger than the Nordhavn 120 currently under construction, and this one — a 68-foot motorsailer.

The 68MS is in official company drawings of layout and general arrangement that appeared on the Nordhavn Dreamers Group website this summer. The new motorsailer builds on the 56MS but, naturally, is significantly roomier and features twin engines.  These drawings show a masthead sloop rig with a large foresail, but company sources indicate the boat could also be delivered as a ketch. You can download the profile drawings here; and the layout drawings here.

How long it takes before we see this boat probably has most to do with how long the recession lasts. While there are a handful of slightly positive economic measures out there, consumer (boat-buyer) uncertainty seems to be at an all-time high. Many boat-builders in the trawler/cruiser/passagemaker segment experienced a sharp drop-off in demand last April, in the midst of what was supposed to have been the recovery. Not only has that caused the untimely death of some companies (see our piece on Nordic Tugs here), but even some of those remaining are beginning to think it might be 2-3 years before demand recovers.

There is a tremendous amount of money out there, but between the “haves” who are worried about tax uncertainties and poor investment vehicles (the stock market); and the “have-nots” who can’t get loans from banks, that money is not being spent on new boats.

Copyright ©2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Cruising Under Sail, Industry News, Powerboats, Sailboats

First Photos — Nordhavn 120 Megayacht

Well, they don’t come any hotter than this.  These photos were taken overnight when the future queen of the Nordhavn fleet was released from her molds at the factory in China.  I’m going to let the photos speak for themselves, but I think you can get from them a couple of things — first, this is a big yacht. It looks like a Nordhavn but bigger and more powerful; like a professional baseball player on the “juice.” (Just kidding, PAE, really!).

You can also see how gorgeous the hull surfaces look, even before they’ve been finished and painted.  There really is nothing like a composite mold to ensure the perfect finish.  Also note the overall scale of the thing by the fellow walking down into the bulbous bow extension. Looks like there might be room in there for crew quarters!  Updated specs and program info available from P.A.E. here.

Starboard Quarter View of the First Nordhavn 120 - Photo Courtesy of P.A.E.

Starboard Quarter View of the First Nordhavn 120 - Photo Courtesy of P.A.E.

Bow of the New Nordhavn 120 as Yacht is Pulled From Mold -- Photo Courtesy of P.A.E.

Bow of the New Nordhavn 120 as Yacht is Pulled From Mold -- Photo Courtesy of P.A.E.

Starboard Bow of the New Nordhavn 120 Half-in, Half-out of Her Mold - Photo Courtesy of P.A.E.

Starboard Bow of the New Nordhavn 120 Half-in, Half-out of Her Mold - Photo Courtesy of P.A.E.

Starboard Hull View of the New Nordhavn 120 - Photo Courtesy of P.A.E.

Starboard Hull View of the New Nordhavn 120 - Photo Courtesy of P.A.E.

Forward Interior Hull View of the New Nordhavn 120 -- Photo Courtesy of P.A.E.

Forward Interior Hull View of the New Nordhavn 120 -- Photo Courtesy of P.A.E.

Transom View of New Nordhavn 120 -- Photo Courtesy of P.A.E.

Transom View of New Nordhavn 120 -- Photo Courtesy of P.A.E.

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, megayachts, Powerboats

New Nordhavn 63 Pictures

Nordhavn 63-01 Sits on Her Lines at the Factory in China

P.A.E. today confirmed that hull #1 of the new Nordhavn 63 is in final preparation for shipment from the factory in China to Florida, where it will be commissioned and available for inspection. The N63 is a development of the N55/N60 series, with new deck and engine room molds. With its beam narrower than the N62, it will fit in places the latter cannot.

Bow-on Shot of the New Nordhavn 63

Bow-on Shot of the New Nordhavn 63

The N63 is described by PAE as an aft-wheelhouse version of the N60, retaining some of the saltiness of the original N62 but with the narrower beam.  In the accompanying photos, you can see it in the “tank” at the factory in China undergoing its first tests and systems checks. P.A.E. President Dan Streech told me yesterday that they hope to ship the boat by mid-September and have it available for viewing by the end of October.

Stern View of the New Nordhavn 63

Stern View of the New Nordhavn 63

Port Bow Photo of New Nordhavn 63

Port Bow Photo of New Nordhavn 63

View of Foredeck on New Nordhavn 63

View of Foredeck on New Nordhavn 63

Port Quarter View of New Nordhavn 63

Port Quarter View of New Nordhavn 63

Starboard Quarter View of New Nordhavn 63

Starboard Quarter View of New Nordhavn 63

Portuguese Bridge on New Nordhavn 63

Portuguese Bridge on New Nordhavn 63

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Powerboats

Nordhavn Offers Flybridge-Less 75 EYF

Nordhavn 75 EYF Without Flybridge

Nordhavn 75 EYF Without Flybridge

Pacific Asian Enterprises said on its website that it has developed a version of its 75 Expedition Yacht Fisher (EYF) without the expansive flybridge common to most sportfishing battlewagons. The change acknowledges the cruising half of this split-personality ocean-going yacht and gives it a more conventional “Norhdavn look.”

I took the liberty of scanning a print of a high-res pdf file of the new profile and layout, which you see here in this article. You can click on the image above for a larger view of it and if you’d like to download the original pdf file, just click here.

According to Chief of Design Jeff Leishman, the design caters to the client who “likes the wide-open layout of the EYF, but doesn’t necessarily need a tower to seek out big game fish.” The boat’s upper deck and huge cockpit provide owners plent of great spaces to sunbathe or entertain al fresco, according to the company.  “And it’s already set up so that if you want to fish, dive, or cruise extensively, all you need to do is pick a destination and go. It’s just a variation of the current Yachtfisher,” says PAE’s vice president Jim Leishman. “I think it will emphasize the versatility of this model.”

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Construction & Technical, Cruising Under Power, Industry News, Passagemaking News, Powerboats

Kadey-Krogen and Nordhavn at the Upcoming Miami Boat Show

2010 Miami International Boat Show and Strictly Sail

2010 Miami International Boat Show and Strictly Sail

Kadey-Krogen said this week that it will have a Krogen 58′ and the 48′ North Sea with the redesigned galley and bridge, which we wrote about here on OceanLines recently.

P.A.E. advises that their final plans for the upcoming Miami boat shows include the 75 EYF and the 62 at Collins Ave., — more formally know as The Yacht and Brokerage Show in Miami Beach.  They also plan to have a 47 over at the on-water display of the actual Miami International Boat Show and Strictly Sail at the Sea Isle Marina in Miami.

At this point, Selene does not appear to have a boat at the show, although the Selene Annapolis dealer will be there and Jet Tern Marine owner and chief designer Howard Chen will be attending to accept an award from MotorBoating Magazine.

We will update you over the next week with the plans of other passagemaking boat builders.  If you use the official website for the boat show, don’t rely on the search function there to tell you who will be there. There are some brands missing from the database. Best to check the website of the brand you’re interested in directly.  Here are the basic logistical details for the main Miami Boat Show, from the show organizers:

Show Information
Dates & Location
February 11–15, 2010
MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION CENTER
1901 Convention Center Drive
Miami Beach, FL 33139

SEA ISLE MARINA & YACHTING CENTER (New home of Strictly Sail Miami, joining forces with the Miami International Boat Show powerboat in-water location)
1635 N. Bayshore Drive
Miami, FL 33132
*** This location now requires a ticket or badge for admission.

NEW! BIG BOAT ROW
Looking for the BIG sailboats? Begin the day at Sea Isle Marina, then head over to Bayside Marina by way of Strictly Sail Miami’s FREE water taxi service to view some of the largest sailboats and catamarans in the world. Lagoon America, Leopard, Prout, Seawind Catamarans, Hylas, Passport and others will all have boats on display at Big Boat Row.

Courtesy Shuttle Buses will run between all locations including the park & ride at the American Airlines Arena from 1 hour prior to show opening through 1 hour after show close daily.

Show Hours
Premier Day
Thursday, February 11, 10:00am–6:00pm

Friday, February 12, 10:00am–8:00pm
Saturday, February 13, 10:00am–8:00pm
Sunday, February 14, 10:00am–8:00pm
Monday, February 15, 10:00am–6:00pm

Sea Isle Marina & Yachting Center is open from 10:00am–6:00pm daily

Admission
NEW — 5 Day Pass (Good all 5 days of the show)
Thursday, February 11th–Monday, February 15th — $75.00

Premier Day — $30.00

Friday–Monday:
Adults — $16.00
2 Day Pass — $30.00
Youth, age 13–15 years — $6.00
Children, age 12 and younger — FREE

Tickets will also be available for purchase at both the Miami Beach Convention Center and the Sea Isle Marina & Yachting Center locations.

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC. All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Industry News, Passagemaking News, Powerboats

Layout Details of the New Nordhavn 78

Preliminary Layout for New Nordhavn 78 -- Drawings Courtesy of P.A.E.

Preliminary Layout for New Nordhavn 78 -- Drawings Courtesy of P.A.E.

P.A.E. has released preliminary layout details for its new Nordhavn 78 long-range motoryacht.  The plans reveal a focus on outside entertaining and roomy berthing spaces. Clicking on the drawing above will open a larger view that can be magnified somewhat to show more detail.

The plans show a spacious owner’s cabin just forward of amidships and oriented fore-and-aft. A sitting area to port and a desk to starboard are complemented by a large head aft and to port, with a walk-in dressing area aft and to starboard. A guest stateroom is farther aft and features twin berths, a spacious head and storage closet. A dedicated laundry room is also on the same aft level.

The main guest stateroom is forward, accessed down a stairway from the pilothouse and features lots of storage and a head between it and the owner’s suite aft (let’s specify extra sound insulation in that bulkhead). The guest suit also has room to port for a small desk or dressing table.

For the crew, there is a captain’s cabin, with a small head in the aft end of the pilothouse; the main quarters being all the way aft, entered normally through a transom door, but also accessible through a hatch in the aft end of the engine room. Another door at the forward end of the engine room leads to the smaller guest suite and laundry room.

The nominal layout for the saloon shows a dining table for eight to port, with sofa and two chairs to starboard. The galley is forward and to port and puts the stove on the large, aft-facing counter, with a raised counter above it and three bar stools on the other side for informal dining or conversation with the chef. The aft cockpit looks roomy and uncluttered, with a long bench along the curved transom with a table in front of it for dining. Curved steps lead down to the swim platform from both corners of the transom.

Up a few steps forward into the pilothouse and you come into a large, comfortable-looking space. Twin helm chairs, with the main instrument panel and controls on the left side and complemented by a large desk/chart space to port and a huge, u-shaped settee and table aft. Sliding doors on either side of the pilothouse lead to wide walkways, which can be followed forward to a large sunpad on the forward deckhouse.

The flybridge is accessed from a starboard stairwell in the pilothouse. There are twin helm chairs forward and to port, and a circular table and chairs behind that. To starboard is an outdoor galley and curved bar. Aft are the Jacuzzi to port and an L-shape settee to starboard. The boat deck is all the way aft and this drawing shows a davit to port and a moderately large Nautica center-console RIB tied down athwartships.

As with most Nordhavns in this size, there is likely to be plenty of flexibility for owners to customize the layouts, particularly on the main deck.

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC

Posted by Tom in Boats, Construction & Technical, Cruising Under Power, Industry News, megayachts, Passagemaking News, Powerboats

P.A.E. Announces New Contemporary Look Nordhavn 78

P.A.E. Artist's Rendering of New Nordhavn 78 With Blue Hull

P.A.E. Artist's Rendering of New Nordhavn 78 With Blue Hull

Pacific Asian Enterprises, Inc., today announced that it was building a new 78-foot yacht that fuses traditional Nordhavn passagemaking design with “European” styling.  The project is already underway and the first hull will be complete in 2011, according to P.A.E.  First public reveal of the new project is planned for next week, with a press event at the Dusseldorf Boat Show.

Here are the details announced today, taken from the P.A.E. press release:

The N78 will serve to fulfill the needs of the class of boater who wants the proven ocean-crossing capabilities of a Nordhavn combined with the sleek lines comprised by typical European-style yachts. “This design will appeal to a whole faction of clientele who tend not to prefer the traditional expedition-type look of a Nordhavn,” says PAE’s vice president, Jim Leishman. “The N78 will evoke a contemporary European feel without losing the dynamic of being a Nordhavn.”

Key to the design is the emphasis Chief Designer Jeff Leishman has placed on outdoor living, starting with the flybridge. The N78’s flybridge will feature a Jacuzzi, wetbar, barbecue and a large open deck area perfect for entertaining. Meanwhile, the foredeck – a typical lounging hotspot on most European boats – has been designated the ideal outdoor “chilling space.” The cockpit of the N78 has been opened up, too, further enhancing entertaining possibilities.

Another draw of the new 78 is that it better segregates the crew from the owners and their guests. Like the entire Nordhavn product range (with the exception of the N120), the N78 was intended to be operated without a captain. However, Leishman has designed engine room access in the transom so that employed crew can enter the area without impacting company on board.

The new N78 will come equipped with twin engines, have ocean-crossing capabilities with a range of 3,000+ miles and superior fuel efficiency. The interior will feature an updated, modern design aesthetic that includes sumptuous owners’ accommodations and two superb guest rooms all with ensuite heads; crew quarters and off-watch quarters.

Although the lines of the N78 will have a European flair, Nordhavn feels the yacht will appeal to international and American markets alike. “The beauty of this design is that it’s a Nordhavn, so you’ve got comfort and confidence while underway, but the benefits will be realized when you’re not passagemaking,” notes Nordhavn Europe’s Philip Roach. “The added elements will really allow you to enjoy your time on board once you’ve arrived.”

 

 
 
 

P.A.E. Artist's Rendering of New Nordhavn 78 With Gray Hull

P.A.E. Artist's Rendering of New Nordhavn 78 With Gray Hull

Nordhavn 78

Preliminary Specifications

LOA:                                       78′-1 1/4″ (23.8m)
LWL:                                       69′ 0″   (21.03 m)
BEAM:                                    21′ 0″   (6.4 m)
DRAFT:                                  7′ 8″   (2.34 m)
DISPLACEMENT:                252,000 LBS   (114.3 METRIC TONS)
WATER:                                 600 GALLONS  (2,271 LITERS)
FUEL:                                     5700 GALLONS  (21,575 LITERS)
HOLDING TANK:                 300 GALLONS  (1,135 LITERS)
GRAY WATER:                    300 GALLONS   (1,135 LITERS)
PROPULSION:                     Twin  Cummins QSM11DM-425 Engines
HORSEPOWER:                 425 HP@1800 RPM

Material taken from P.A.E. press release

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Industry News, Passagemaking News, Powerboats

Outfitting the Nordhavn 55 with Computers – Part 2

John Marshall's Nordhavn 55 Serendipity - Photo Credit: CJ Walker

This is Part 2 of our new series on outfitting the Nordhavn 55 with computers instead of, or in addition to dedicated marine electronics such as chartplotters.  In the first installment we covered the boat itself, along with some comments about the boat from an actual owner, John Marshall.  In this article, John gives us his thoughts on the subject of computers aboard. John has some definite opinions, but they’re grounded in hard experience and are worth listening to.  Particularly note John’s views on keeping his computers isolated from potential outside infections and instability-causing “updates.”

Q&A with N55 Serendipity owner John Marshall

1.    Do you use any PCs or Macs onboard Serendipity?

We have five computers on Serendipity, with four in active use and one as backup.

2.    What are their roles?

-Two Macbooks, my wife’s and mine, are for personal use, email, web browsing, etc. We mostly use cellular data cards for internet connection as its more reliable than Wifi (and we have one of those Syrens bridges and internal AP).

– Primary Navigation: One desktop-style PC (120v) with Win/XP is dedicated to running Nobeltec.

– Backup Navigation: One notebook PC with Win/XP is my “hot backup” Nav system (also with Nobeltec). It can be plugged into the main instruments and GPS via a USB cable, but also has its own hockey-puck GPS. This is also my satellite communication PC (Inmarsat Fleet 55 running MPDS and Ocens email) as the OS needs to be stripped down to avoid to much background traffic. (*More on that later).

– One backup desktop PC that runs on 24v that’s configured with Nobeltec and can be used to replace the Primary Nav computer if it dies. This computer is stored, disconnected, in a metal case down below waterline.

3.    How did you select them?

PCs were selected given that’s what Nobeltec and my comm software ran on. So basically, the application software drove the selection.

Macs because we love the OS and Apps… we’re Mac people who suffer Windows because we have to. Unfortunately, none of the Mac-based navigation software is up the Nobeltec standard, at least IMHO.

 4.    Would you be comfortable with a computer-based nav system as your primary system?

Absolutely and I am. But… the caveat here is that I have two Furuno NavNet2 BB systems with chart plotters, and backup PC’s. I use the Furuno’s as read-only displays, but I know I can navigate the boat from them if needed, but I don’t like the interface for routes, etc. But the Furunos and their networked sounder, radar, plotters are wonderful as read-only instruments.

I also like having more than one chart source running, and I tend to keep one Furuno chartplotter zoomed down to 2 mile range so it shows great detail, and sometimes overlay radar on the chart, and then use Nobeltec for big picture and route planning as well as my autopilot interface for route following. 

A PC (running any of the available Nav applications) is infinitely superior to any chartplotter I’ve ever seen for route planning and route management.

 5.    If you have a PC aboard, does it serve any other roles, such as entertainment, ship management, etc.?

No, unless you count my iPod that’s hooked into the Bose system.

One thing I am a big believer in is minimizing the single points of failure. For instance, I would never consider putting my nav computer on a network or have it running background tasks. I don’t trust Windows that much. So I’m not a fan of a “wired, networked” boat, and prefer simple computers with an inactive backup computer. If lightning or viruses kill or disable my Nav computer, or the hardware just dies, I know I have a clean, backup machine kept in a Farraday-shielded box that I can quickly plug in and get running.

Also, I’ve only been able to gain confidence in Windows-based computers by stripping them down. No auto-updates, no antivirus, etc. Stripped down to just the base OS and Nobeltec. Then they are very reliable. But of course, in that mode, I can’t expose them to the internet, except to access Nobeltec or  Jeppeson sites for software and chart updates, in which case I use a USB cellular card.

*Background traffic: I’ve found the Windows OS and its applications (anti-virus being the worst) generate a lot of background traffic looking for updates or whatever, even when the user-configurable auto-update features are turned off. When I pay dearly for bandwidth, not connect time, as I do with Inmarsat and MPDS, that background traffic can be 10x or even 100x my actual email traffic. Even if I was paying for connect time, but had severely limited bandwidth as is the case with Iridium, the same issue applies. So stripping as much of that junk out as possible is key. I’m also experimenting with a third-party firewall that should let me block the OS from looking for updates. The built-in firewalls always trust the OS to communicate with its own trusted sites so you can’t keep them from talking.)

In the next installment in this series, we’ll publish the “Request for Proposals” detailing what we’re asking the computer companies to address with their suggested installations for an N55.  We’ll also have an extensive set of documents and drawings to share with you and we’ll start to get into the details of computer installations aboard.  Follow-on articles will each have the response from an individual computer company.  Stay tuned.

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Electronics, Passagemaking News, People, People & Profiles, Technology

Outfitting the Nordhavn 55 with Computers

Nordhavn 55 Starboard Running -- Photo Courtesy of PAE

With this article, we are beginning a new series that illustrates how the Nordhavn 55, one of the most popular of the globe-girdling Nordhavns built by Pacific Asian Enterprises, might be equipped with computers for navigation and other chores.  Earlier this year, OceanLines ran an extensive series of articles on outfitting the Kadey-Krogen 55′ Expedition with a full marine electronics suite.  In this new series, we look at the alternative to dedicated marine electronics — the PC.  There are several companies in this market, including some that manufacture or modify their own components and some that are systems designers and installers.  We’re asking them to submit full proposals for navigation, monitoring and entertainment solutions. As we did before, we’ll dedicate a separate article for each manufacturer to highlight its proposal for the N55.  Today’s article is the first of two introducing the series. Part 2 follows tomorrow and offers a dedicated Q&A on the subject with a current N55 owner.

The Nordhavn 55 was developed as a logical follow-on to the 47, but is obviously substantially larger in all the spaces. The N55 has a standard flybridge and single engine, although N55 Project Manager Mike Jensen says 7 N55s have been delivered with twin engines. The N55 has a new sister ship with the advent of a 5-foot hull extension creating the N60. The extra length shows up in the cockpit and extended boat deck overhead.

Nordhavn President Dan Streech suggested we use the N55 as the subject for this series since it represents the classice Nordhavn trawler, in form and function. Not surprisingly, N55 owners agree with that sentiment.  John Marshall owns N5520, Serendipity, and says, “I view the N55 as the largest of the ‘simple, little boats’. It’s really not much more complex than an N40 (same numbers of systems, one main engine, one wing, one genset, same stabilizer design, etc. etc., just beefier) so it’s just as easy to maintain as the littlest Nordhavn. For instance, it’s no harder to maintain a 300 hp diesel than a 120 hp diesel.”  Here’s more of what John Marshall has to say about the N55:

It’s the ultimate couples boat as its big and roomy but still simple, but has extra staterooms for guests when needed. We use the upstairs Captain’s cabin mainly as a reading room, for instance, given the great light.

That said, you could make an N55 complex by adding twin engines, full hydraulics, dual generators, etc. etc, but most of the N55s I’ve seen are closer to the N40 in complexity. (The only place where the N55 is inescapably larger is when you have to wax it!)

Once you step over that size threshold, Nordhavns, like most boats, get far more complex. While the bigger boats aren’t necessarily harder to operate, the maintenance chores can overwhelm many couples. The larger boats mostly come with twin engines, twin gensets, complex hydraulic and electrical systems, etc. Bottom line, even a mechanically adept owner of the larger boats may want a captain or boat manager just to keep on top of everything, otherwise you become a slave to boat maintenance. As I see it, the bigger boats are really very seaworthy pocket superyachts than traditional trawlers.

I suspect that might be what Dan is referring to when he says the N55 is a “classic trawler”, given that designation implies (to me!) a boat that is simple enough for an active and resourceful owner to maintain and operate without difficulty, and has the seaworthiness of a traditional trawler.

The topic of this series is installing computers in the N55, so I asked Mike Jensen about recent trends.  Using a computer — as opposed to a dedicated chartplotter — for navigation is becoming more ubiquitous on this type of yacht. Jensen says about 75 percent of N55 customers are using computers for navigation, with perhaps half also using them for entertainment. Anecdotal research suggests that when they are used for entertainment, they are likely to be dedicated to that function. John Marshall’s setup is an example of the philosophy behind that “separation of church and state.”  In tomorrow’s installment, you can read a Q&A with John about the computers installed on Serendipity.

(Read Part 2 in this series here)

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Electronics, Gear & Apparel, Passagemaking News, Technology