pocket trawlers

Five Pocket Trawlers for Consideration

Call them pocket-trawlers or mini/pocket-tugs, the North Pacific Yachts 28’ Pilothouse, Nordic Tugs 26, Ranger Tugs 25SC, Minor Offshore 25, and Rosborough RF-246 have hardiness and efficiency in common.

The terms “pocket trawler” and “pocket tug” don’t really have precise definitions, yet both connote a small, salty vessel that’s probably a jack-of-all-trades and won’t break the bank. In that sense, the labels work, and in this article we take a look at five popular pocket trawlers to consider if you’re looking for a capable small cruiser under 30 feet.

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Editor’s Note — This is a preview of a longer piece I wrote for Yachtworld.com.  I write a monthly boat review for Yachtworld/Boats.com.  The sites have a large, and growing collection of features, mostly written by dedicated marine journalists (like me!).  The full article at Yachtworld has more detail about the boats, specs, prices and photos.
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Nordic Tugs 26

The rejuvenation of Nordic Tugs 26production three years ago was cause for celebration among the Nordic Tugs faithful. First introduced more than 30 years ago and withdrawn in 1997, its 2011 incarnation features a smart Cummins QSD 115-hp diesel and has a range of about 150 NM on its 75 gallons of fuel, cruising at 8 knots. Top speed is about 14 knots.

North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse

The North Pacific Yachts 28is the smallest boat in the company’s lineup, and it carries on the philosophy of providing maximum value for the dollar. Built from a new hull design by Karl Stambaugh at an experienced yard in China and well-equipped right off the delivery ship, a new 28 will run you about $177,500. The only thing you need to add to that base configuration is electronics. The boat comes standard with a single 150-hp Cummins QSD diesel, bow thruster, windlass with anchor, chain, and rope rode, raw water washdown, teak and holly floor and hand-rubbed teak paneling and cabinetry. All the sliding windows have screens, and curtains are even provided.

Ranger Tugs 25SC

In 2010, Ranger Tugs modified the design of its popular 25SCto increase the size of the cockpit (“Sport Cockpit”), but taking some room out of the deckhouse. It was a good idea because it makes the cockpit truly useful now and ensures good access to the standard Yanmar 150 -hp diesel. The R25 has always been one of the most popular of the Ranger Tugs line. Its classic “tiny tug” lines draw visitors at the dock, and the company insists on a high level of standard equipment.

Minor Offshore 25

Finland has a generations-old tradition of producing hardy, all-weather and all-season cruising boats. Two of these brands are now available in the United States; the Nord Star line and Minor Offshore boats. (See our recent reviews of the Nord Star 26 and the Nord Star 31.) For this roundup we chose the new Minor Offshore 25.

The Minor Offshore brand is imported to the U.S. by Skarne Marine, in Milford, CT. The look of these boats isn’t so much tugboat as it is military or government patrol boat. In fact, many are sold for just those purposes. But they work as a great all-weather cruising boat for a couple or a small family, too. The 25 has a fully enclosed pilothouse, wide sidedecks, a decently sized cockpit, and a huge swim platform.

Rosborough RF-246

Rosborough is a family company, headquartered in Halifax, Nova Scotia, that builds a feature-packed cruiser for the rough North Atlantic waters that the company’s government and military customers operate in. Interestingly, Roseborough’s RF-246 sedan-style cruiser (also available in a Custom Wheelhouse configuration) can be powered by either outboards or a sterndrive. The hull features a full-length 9” keel for directional stability. The beam is 8’ 6” and the overall length is 25’.

To see all the specs, more details about the boats, as well as some photos, see my original piece on Yachtworld here.

Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Powerboats

Minor Offshore has a New 28′ Cruiser

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser

The Minor Offshore brand of Finland-built patrol/cruiser boats has introduced a new 28′ model that strikes a good balance between affordability and size — all packaged in a hardy, family-ready cruising boat.  Represented in the U.S. by Skarne Marine, of Milford, Connecticut, the Minor Offshore boats could eventually become major players in the small-to-mid-size cruising market.  These are tough, seaworthy boats meant to be used and they’re built to be economical to operate and maintain.

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser. Interior Looking Forward.

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser. Interior Looking Forward.

The 28 features two cozy, double cabins and an enclosed head compartment.  There is a compact galley with a two-burner stove and sink with hot and cold water.  There are some nice standard features on this boat, including a bow thruster, which will be helpful to those who aren’t proficient yet with a sterndrive around the docks. A Raymarine C120W chartplotter is also standard, along with power trim assist, interval wipers, remote-controlled searchlight, auto trimtabls, defroster, stainless steel keel protection, adjustable passenger seat and teak interior.

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser.  Interior Seen Through Sunroof.

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser. Interior Seen Through Sunroof.

I really like the sunroof on these boats; mainly for the way they open up the interiors and offer abundant fresh air from a source up and away from any incidental spray.  Another thing to note is the kind of utilitarian detail on these boats.  The rubrail, for example, is a beefy, thick rubber that runs around the entire boat.  These boat builders understand that in the real world, boats bump into things — docks, pilings, other boats — and as pretty as a nice stainless insert is, it’s gonna get scratched, and worse, scratch whatever it hits.  This kind of practicality seems to be a feature of the Nordic-built boats I’ve reviewed lately.

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser at the Dock. Note Rubrail Visible at Transom

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser at the Dock. Note Rubrail Visible at Transom

These are all diesel-powered boats, using Volvo engines.  The 28 comes with a D4-260 Duoprop as the standard engine, but can handle up to a D6-370 single, or twin D3-220s.  The base engine will still drive the boat to 30 knots and at a 25-knot cruise should still get nearly 3 nmpg.  With 83 gallons of fuel aboard, you could cruise for days on a typical trip around coastal waters without having to refuel.  As with all sterndrives, you need to learn how to use thrust from the Duoprop to help you in a turn; the drive unit itself being something of an undersized stand-alone rudder.  The standard bow thruster will serve as a set of suspenders while you learn how to use your belt.

Running Shot of Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser.

Running Shot of Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser.

The Sarin family, has been building boats for three generations now in the Ostrobothnia region of Finland. The Minor Offshore line is considered an all-season line by its builder. I suppose with short summers and long, dark seasons, that would be a necessity.  I didn’t look the word up in a Finnish dictionary to be sure, but the company claims the “Minor” name of the line comes from the family’s humility. They are clearly NOT minor boats, and are certified to the CE offshore B standard, which is just plain nasty weather — a sea state of waves up to 4 meters and wind of 40 knots.

(An aside here — the actual CE Category B refers to the Beaufort Scale number of 8, which is a full gale of 40 knots, and also refers to a wave height of up to 4 meters. Curiously, the Beaufort Scale suggests that wave heights at a wind speed of 40 knots could be from 5.5 meters up to 7.5 meters, about 25 ft.  So the CE category standard refers to a sea state that is actually lower than what is expected at the standard’s wind speed.  Odd.)

I like the idea of a steel-reinforced keel; it would likely come in handy in my rocky-bottom home waters of Long Island Sound.

We’ll be testing the Minor Offshore line as soon as the weather warms up enough here in New England to splash the boats.  In the meantime, check out the Skarne Marine website and take a gander at the specs.

Minor Offshore 28
Specifications

Length over all 27.1 ft Engine rec. (single) 225-370 hp
Hull length 25.2 ft Engine rec. (twin) 340-440 hp
Beam 9.4 ft Top speed range 30-42 kn
Draft 3.1 ft Fuel consumption (25 knots) 0.27 gal/nm (est.)
Displacement 3.52 tons Maximum cruising range/time 305 nm/12.2h
Overall height 12.9 ft Maximum load 2204 lbs
Height above WL 9.8 ft Ce category B-Offshore
No. of cabin seats 6 Base Price (excl. shipping)  —  $190,881.
Berths 4 Est. Shipping and import duties — approx. $12K
Fuel tank 83.15 gal  
Water tank 26.4 gal  
Septic tank 10.5 gal  
Battery 2×100 Ah

 

Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Powerboats

Nord Star Offers New 24 Offshore Model with Outboard Power

New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Nord Star USA and Brewer Yacht Sales will be showing a new Nord Star 24 Offshore model from the Finnish boat builder at the New England Boat Show in late February.  The boat features outboard propulsion but retains the salty pilothouse looks of its sister ships in the Nord Star Patrol line that runs all the way up to 40′.

New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Interior Forward View of New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Interior Forward View of New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

The 24 Offshore with outboards features a vee berth forward and seating for up to six in the pilothouse.  I’ve written before about the Nord Star line — I tested both the 26 and 31 — and I think they’re worth a good, long look.  The design and construction are to hardy commercial Finnish workboat standards, and the systems and features are first-rate.  This new outboard version of the 24 will offer a little more mechanical simplicity, as well as below-decks storage, for an owner who prefers an outboard solution, rather than the standard Volvo diesel.

Vee Berth Aboard New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Vee Berth Aboard New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Marine Head Aboard New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Marine Head Aboard New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

I don’t have the specs on the outboard choice(s) yet, but in the images you see with this story, taken from the company website, the boat has been fitted with a sizeable Honda, probably the 225, which is built around a 5.6L V-6.  Maximum recommended horsepower would be around 250, based on the listed 200 kW.  I noticed that the listed beam measurement of 8′ – 9″ means that it would require a special trailer permit in most of the United States, but they’re simple to get and frankly, with a weight of just under 3 tons withOUT the motor, you’re not gonna just drag this around behind your Civic.  It does mean, though, that you can probably store it in the backyard or driveway in the off-season.

Looking Aft from the Cabin Aboard New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Looking Aft from the Cabin Aboard New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

If you can visit Boston in late February, you’ll see this boat at the New England Boat Show.  You can download a basic brochure on the inboard-powered 24 model here

Layout of the New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Layout of the New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Nord Star 24 Offshore
Specifications

IMCI CE-B OFFSHORE  
Total length 7,8m (25’6”)
Total width 2,7m (8’9”)
Hull v-angle (stern) 18,3
Height in main cabin 1,88m (6’2”)
Transportheight (with cradle) 2,95m (9’7”)
Max. recommended nr. of persons 6
Max. recommended
propulsion power
200 kw
TANK SIZE CHART  
Water 50L (13 gal)
Septic 47L (12 gal)
Diesel 240L (63 gal)
LOADING  
Max. recommended loading 600 kg
(1323 lb)
WEIGHTS (avarage)  
Weight (without engine) 1900 kg
(5732 lb)

 

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Powerboats

2011 Ranger Tugs Rendezvous Set for Sept. 9-11

Ranger Tugs Gather at a Recent Rendezvous in Bremerton, Washington

Ranger Tugs Gather at a Recent Rendezvous in Bremerton, Washington

Following a successful 2010 owners’ rendezvous in Bremerton, Washington, this past September, Ranger Tugs has announced that the 2011 edition will take place September 9-11, 2011, again in Bremerton, at the Port of Bremerton Marina. Some 42 Ranger Tugs attended the fleet gathering this year, up a third over the previous year.  Ranger Tugs are among the most popular smaller cruising boats and we’ve written extensively about them here on OceanLines.

David and Maureen Baker, owners of the Ranger 29 Karma, served as the event’s volunteer organizers this year, and helped convince owners and enthusiasts from as far away as Virginia to attend.  Several Ranger Tugs owners trailered their boats to the area and launched locally for the cruise to Bremerton. In addition to the typical social events, organizers hosted MER Equipment, an area Yanmar dealer and service center, for a demonstration of some basic maintenance techniques on the Yanmar diesels that power Ranger Tugs.

Organizers hope to continue to grow the Northwest-based event, and more information about it is available on the owners’ website, TugNuts. As of this writing, there have been approximately 1,000 Ranger Tugs delivered.

While some East Coast owners will travel to the factory-sponsored event in Washington, northeast dealer Wilde Yacht Sales in Essex, Connecticut, plans a regional rendezvous in Essex.  We will publish more information on that event separately here on OceanLines.

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Destinations, Powerboats

Nordic Tugs Production Re-Starting

Starboard running shot of the new Nordic Tugs 39

Starboard running shot of the new Nordic Tugs 39

News this week from Nordic Tugs, Inc., that it has re-started production after a three-month hiatus during which most of the operational employees were laid off.  Bob Shamek, who heads sales and marketing for Nordic Tugs, said workers were being recalled as the production processes ramp up.

View of the pilothouse and expanded helm of the new Nordic Tugs 39

View of the pilothouse and expanded helm of the new Nordic Tugs 39

The company has a number of boats on order from its dealer network, including some for its newest model, the NT-39, photos of which are shown in this piece.  The Nordic Tugs line now includes the 26, 34, 39, 42, 49 and 54.

Salon aboard the new Nordic Tugs 39

Salon aboard the new Nordic Tugs 39

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Industry News, Powerboats

Nord Star 26 Should Be Your New SUV

Nord Star 26 Pocket Cruiser and Sport Utility Vessel

Nord Star 26 Pocket Cruiser and Sport Utility Vessel

There are not too many boats in this size category that truly work as cruisers, but the Nord Star 26 is the kind of marine SUV (Sport Utility Vessel) that can take a small family for nice summer cruises and be wildly entertaining in between.  It’s all made possible by the mad-crazy efficient layout of the boat and its powerful yet fuel-sipping Volvo diesel.  The fit and finish are equal to the best of old-world craftsmanship and the total package is the perfect way for a young family to get into cruising.

Nord Star 26 View Looking Forward

Nord Star 26 View Looking Forward

A little bit about the company, fromour July, 2009 feature on the Nord Star 31:

First, a little background on the Nord Star brand. These boats, which comprise a model line known fully as the Nord Star Patrol series, ranging from 24 feet to 40 feet, are built in Finland by parent company Linex-Boat Oy, the Lindkvist family-owned firm that has delivered more than 3,000 recreational, commercial and government-class vessels. The patriarch of the Lindkvist family started building wooden fishing and work boats in the 1920′s. Today’s modern fiberglass production facility is certified to the highest ISO 9001-2000 standards and the boats themselves meet the stringent CE Ocean Class B rating for offshore seaworthiness. That last standard means, among other things, that the boats will safely handle seas up to 13′ and winds in excess of 40 knots. Suffice it to say the boat can handle more than you can.

Nord Star Interior Looking Aft

Nord Star Interior Looking Aft

As I mentioned, the 26 reviewed here is probably the smallest cruising boat that can comfortably take a couple or young family on long weekend cruises. But it’s also the kind of boat that you will use not just for cruising but for fishing and regular day trips to your favorite gunkhole.  There’s a vee berth for two, along with a separate head compartment and a small but functional galley below. Ingenious layout in the main cabin includes convertible seating and hi-lo tables — all with a magnificent view.  You can see in the photos here that the company has devised a cool Bimini for the aft cockpit that shades but doesn’t get in the way.

I tested the boat over a couple of hours out of Mattituck Inlet on Long Island, New York. The head of Nord Star USA, John Uljens, brought the boat over from its base in Connecticut and we ran her through a series of test runs.  The Nord Star boats look like a cross between a pocket tug and a government patrol boat. It’s a unique look that draws attention at the dock. But don’t be misled — it’s all about form following function. The reverse rake to the windshield minimizes sun glare from outside and instrument glare from inside at night. The tall house and large windows open things up and make the cabin feel larger than it is.

The boat has a functional aft cockpit and an amazing swim platform that feels like it could host an entire picnic while on the hook.  There are wide side decks to make transiting forward and aft safe.

The performance of the boat is nothing short of impressive.  The modified-vee planing hull comes up out of the water quickly and with minimal bow rise. The Volvo diesel supplies fantastic torque all the way up the RPM curve, unlike a gas engine and within seconds you are skimming along the water in the mid-20 knot range.  There really isn’t any major noise at the helm. Decibel readings (A-levels) stayed below 80, which means low fatigue on longer transits.  A look at the photo below shows the insulated engine compartment hatch, and the roominess of the compartment itself.

 

Nord Star 26 Engine Compartment Showing Volvo D4 Diesel

Nord Star 26 Engine Compartment Showing Volvo D4 Diesel

 

 

Nord Star 26

Specifications

IMCI CE-B OFFSHORE  
Total length 8,4m (27’6”)
Total width 2,8m (9’2”)
Hull v-angle (stern) 18,3
Height in main cabin 1,9m (6’2”)
Transport Height (with cradle) 3,05m (10′)
Max. recommended nr. of persons 6
Max. recommended
propulsion power
298 kw
TANK SIZE CHART  
Water 100L (26 gal)
Septic 47L (12 gal)
Diesel 320L (84 gal)
LOADING  
Max. recommended loading 600 kg
(1323 lb)
WEIGHTS (average)  
Engine
Weight
Volvo Penta D4
3300 kg
(7275 lb)

John Uljens Demonstrates the Sunroof on the Nord Star 26

John Uljens Demonstrates the Sunroof on the Nord Star 26

A Working Bowsprit and Anchor Roller on the Nord Star 26

A Working Bowsprit and Anchor Roller on the Nord Star 26

Roomy Foredeck and Side Decks on the Nord Star 26

Roomy Foredeck and Side Decks on the Nord Star 26

Download the company brochure on the Nord Star 26 here.

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Powerboats

First Photos: North Pacific Yachts 28-01 Hull Released from Mold

OceanLines is pleased to bring you the first photos of hull #1 of the North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse trawler just after its release from the mold.  These pictures, aside from documenting the continuing progress of the first of this new model for NPY, also show some of the interesting design details of the boat.

Starboard Quarter Photo of new North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse Trawler -- Photo:  North Pacific Yachts

Starboard Quarter Photo of new North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse Trawler -- Photo: North Pacific Yachts

In the picture above you get a good sense of the general lines of the NPY 28, with its gracefully sweeping sheer, mirrored by the molded rubrail.  You also get a nice view here of the full-length keel and the shoe for the rudder.  The prop on this boat will be fully protected from damage during minor groundings.  The tall transom will keep following seas outside of the cockpit.

Port Quarter Photo of First Hull for North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse Line -- Photo:  North Pacific Yachts

Port Quarter Photo of First Hull for North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse Line -- Photo: North Pacific Yachts

In the second picture, we see the port side of the hull, with  what looks to be a very smooth finish.  You can see some of the molded “planking” surface detail in this view, too, that will contribute to the traditional look of this pocket trawler.

Port Bow Photo of First Hull for New North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse Trawler -- Photo:  North Pacific Yachts

Port Bow Photo of First Hull for New North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse Trawler -- Photo: North Pacific Yachts

The third photo gives a good look at the stem and fine entry of the bow.  You can see that the sharp vee of the forward hull transitions to fairly flat sections aft, which will enable the higher-end speeds the 28 will be capable of.  The hard chine runs the full length of the hull and will contribute both to roll dampening and turning performance.

Port Overhead Photo of Hull Interior of New North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse -- Photo:  North Pacific Yachts

Port Overhead Photo of Hull Interior of New North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse -- Photo: North Pacific Yachts

Port Bow Overhead Photo of Hull Bulkheads for New North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse Trawler -- Photo:  North Pacific Yachts

Port Bow Overhead Photo of Hull Bulkheads for New North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse Trawler -- Photo: North Pacific Yachts

In the last two photos, the interior bulkheads are easily visible at the beginning of the interior finishing process.  This begins to give the viewer a sense of the space of interior compartments.  According to North Pacific Yachts, the boat is still on schedule for delivery to North America late this summer.  Competition in this pocket trawler market will heat up considerably when it does, given the remarkable pricing on this boat (see earlier OceanLines article on the NPY 28 here).

Copyright © 2009 OceanLines LLC

Posted by Tom in Boats

North Pacific 28 “Pocket Trawler” in Production

Some new photos for you this week of the North Pacific Yachts 28 in production at the factory in China.  There is a lot of interest in this boat; since we first wrote about it here on OceanLines, it has become our most-read story.  In the photos below you can see the hull and superstructure molds as they’re being worked on and you’ll get a good sense of what the boat is going to look like.  We still expect to see it here in the U.S. later this summer.   Given the overall interest in the market in “pocket trawlers,” and readers’ fascination with this particular boat, it seems likely this one will have some success.

North Pacific Yacht 28 Hull and Deckhouse Construction Photo

North Pacific Yacht 28 Hull and Deckhouse Construction Photo

 

In the next photo you get a good look at the shape of the pilothouse.

Photo of North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse in Construction

Photo of North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse in Construction

 

And one more view of the deckhouse:

Quarter View of North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse in Construction

Quarter View of North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse in Construction

Copyright © 2009 OceanLines LLC

Posted by Tom in Boats

North Pacific 28′ is an Affordable Pocket Trawler

North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse Rendering

North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse Rendering

Here at OceanLines we get an enormous number of visitors looking for information about some of the smaller trawlers out there; boats like the Ranger Tugs 25 and 29, the Nordic Tugs 26 and some of the other “pocket tugs.”  The North Pacific Yachts 28′ Pilothouse is another example of these cozy cruisers, but one that won’t melt your wallet and might be just the thing if you need a truly trailerable vacation boat.   The hull of NP28-01 is in the mold now and is scheduled for delivery to Seattle in August.  It should make its first public appearance at the Seattle Boat Show.

The NP28 is the third boat in the North Pacific lineup and it carries on the company’s philosophy of providing maximum value for the dollar.  Built from a new hull design by Karl Stambaugh at an experienced yard in China and well equipped right off the delivery ship, a new 28′ will run you about $165,000.  The only thing you need to add to that base configuration is electronics.  The boat comes standard with a single 130 HP Cummins QSD diesel, bow thruster, windlass with anchor, chain and rope rode, raw water washdown, teak and holly floor and hand-rubbed teak paneling and cabinetry.  All the sliding windows have screens and curtains are even provided.

Interior Configuration of the North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse

Interior Configuration of the North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse

The boat has two bunks forward, a convertible in the pilothouse, and one in the salon.  According to North Pacific CEO Trevor Brice, “The NP28 seems to appeal to a much more broad customer range (than the larger trawlers).  We’ve had people who are looking at the NP28 as their only boat and others who own larger yachts but want the flexibility to enjoy cruising elsewhere when it is off-season where their larger boat is located.”

You can optionally upgrade the toilet to a Tecma unit from the standard manual flush and you can add a 3 kW genny.  The propane stove, however, and a 20 lb. tank and locker are standard so you don’t need electricity to cook with.  You can save $3K by deleting the Espar diesel furnace, but odds are you would do that to add $4K worth of reverse-cycle air conditioning and then you’ll want that genny.

Initial performance estimates indicate the boat should be capable of speeds up to 14 knots.  Fuel burn at 6 knots will be about 1 GPH, while at 12 knots it should be somewhere around 6 GPH.  With its 100 gallon fuel tanks, the NP28 has a theoretical range of 600 NM.  Even at top speed, it will have a range well above 200 NM.  Either way, that’s anywhere from a couple, to several days of comfortable cruising without worrying about refueling.  There is also 40 gallons of fresh water aboard and the 160 amp alternator on the engine will charge even a huge house battery bank in short order.

With its 8-foot, six-inch beam, the NP28 is truly trailerable.  While it’s not a show-stopper for some folks, boats like the Nordic Tugs 26, at 9-feet, six inches, do require a special trailering permit in nearly all U.S. states.  According to Brice North Pacific has identified a number of trailer manufacturers who can supply a suitable trailer, but has not specified a vendor because of the wide variation in personal preferences for trailer features.

In short, the NP28 looks like it’s going to provide some real competition to similar-sized boats in the Nordic Tugs, Ranger Tugs and other “pocket trawler” makers’ lines.

Copyright © 2009 OceanLines LLC

Posted by Tom in Boats