powerboats

Minor Offshore has a New 28′ Cruiser

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser

The Minor Offshore brand of Finland-built patrol/cruiser boats has introduced a new 28′ model that strikes a good balance between affordability and size — all packaged in a hardy, family-ready cruising boat.  Represented in the U.S. by Skarne Marine, of Milford, Connecticut, the Minor Offshore boats could eventually become major players in the small-to-mid-size cruising market.  These are tough, seaworthy boats meant to be used and they’re built to be economical to operate and maintain.

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser. Interior Looking Forward.

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser. Interior Looking Forward.

The 28 features two cozy, double cabins and an enclosed head compartment.  There is a compact galley with a two-burner stove and sink with hot and cold water.  There are some nice standard features on this boat, including a bow thruster, which will be helpful to those who aren’t proficient yet with a sterndrive around the docks. A Raymarine C120W chartplotter is also standard, along with power trim assist, interval wipers, remote-controlled searchlight, auto trimtabls, defroster, stainless steel keel protection, adjustable passenger seat and teak interior.

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser.  Interior Seen Through Sunroof.

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser. Interior Seen Through Sunroof.

I really like the sunroof on these boats; mainly for the way they open up the interiors and offer abundant fresh air from a source up and away from any incidental spray.  Another thing to note is the kind of utilitarian detail on these boats.  The rubrail, for example, is a beefy, thick rubber that runs around the entire boat.  These boat builders understand that in the real world, boats bump into things — docks, pilings, other boats — and as pretty as a nice stainless insert is, it’s gonna get scratched, and worse, scratch whatever it hits.  This kind of practicality seems to be a feature of the Nordic-built boats I’ve reviewed lately.

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser at the Dock. Note Rubrail Visible at Transom

Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser at the Dock. Note Rubrail Visible at Transom

These are all diesel-powered boats, using Volvo engines.  The 28 comes with a D4-260 Duoprop as the standard engine, but can handle up to a D6-370 single, or twin D3-220s.  The base engine will still drive the boat to 30 knots and at a 25-knot cruise should still get nearly 3 nmpg.  With 83 gallons of fuel aboard, you could cruise for days on a typical trip around coastal waters without having to refuel.  As with all sterndrives, you need to learn how to use thrust from the Duoprop to help you in a turn; the drive unit itself being something of an undersized stand-alone rudder.  The standard bow thruster will serve as a set of suspenders while you learn how to use your belt.

Running Shot of Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser.

Running Shot of Minor Offshore 28 Pilothouse Family Cruiser.

The Sarin family, has been building boats for three generations now in the Ostrobothnia region of Finland. The Minor Offshore line is considered an all-season line by its builder. I suppose with short summers and long, dark seasons, that would be a necessity.  I didn’t look the word up in a Finnish dictionary to be sure, but the company claims the “Minor” name of the line comes from the family’s humility. They are clearly NOT minor boats, and are certified to the CE offshore B standard, which is just plain nasty weather — a sea state of waves up to 4 meters and wind of 40 knots.

(An aside here — the actual CE Category B refers to the Beaufort Scale number of 8, which is a full gale of 40 knots, and also refers to a wave height of up to 4 meters. Curiously, the Beaufort Scale suggests that wave heights at a wind speed of 40 knots could be from 5.5 meters up to 7.5 meters, about 25 ft.  So the CE category standard refers to a sea state that is actually lower than what is expected at the standard’s wind speed.  Odd.)

I like the idea of a steel-reinforced keel; it would likely come in handy in my rocky-bottom home waters of Long Island Sound.

We’ll be testing the Minor Offshore line as soon as the weather warms up enough here in New England to splash the boats.  In the meantime, check out the Skarne Marine website and take a gander at the specs.

Minor Offshore 28
Specifications

Length over all 27.1 ft Engine rec. (single) 225-370 hp
Hull length 25.2 ft Engine rec. (twin) 340-440 hp
Beam 9.4 ft Top speed range 30-42 kn
Draft 3.1 ft Fuel consumption (25 knots) 0.27 gal/nm (est.)
Displacement 3.52 tons Maximum cruising range/time 305 nm/12.2h
Overall height 12.9 ft Maximum load 2204 lbs
Height above WL 9.8 ft Ce category B-Offshore
No. of cabin seats 6 Base Price (excl. shipping)  —  $190,881.
Berths 4 Est. Shipping and import duties — approx. $12K
Fuel tank 83.15 gal  
Water tank 26.4 gal  
Septic tank 10.5 gal  
Battery 2×100 Ah

 

Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Powerboats

Outer Reef to Represent Kadey-Krogen Internationally

Kadey-Krogen Company Logo

Kadey-Krogen Company Logo

Outer Reef Yachts Company Logo

Outer Reef Yachts Company Logo

Apparently Kadey-Krogen had visions of international sugar plums dancing in its corporate head this holiday season, because today they announced with Outer Reef an agreement to have OR represent Kadey-Krogen through all of OR’s “established international sales and service locations.”

I’ll probably have more information over the next few weeks, but it’s clear the companies see the venture as non-competitive because of the size range of the two product lines — Kadey-Krogen mostly below 60′ (except the 64′ Expedition, which isn’t here yet), and Outer Reef mostly above 60′ (except for the 58′ motoryacht).

Here’s the copy from the release.

“With Outer Reef offices and service centers in Sydney, Australia, and seven locations throughout Europe, Kadey-Krogen is poised to hit the ground running as we launch into the international market. Partnering with a company with an established international sales and service network made good business sense for us, but it was even more important to find a company like Outer Reef that shares our vision of customer service,” says John Gear, President of Kadey-Krogen Yachts.

“We see the representation of Kadey-Krogen Yachts as a great opportunity to offer a very high quality product to our international clientele in the under 60’ range, a size range that Outer Reef Yachts currently does not offer. Kadey-Krogen is synonymous with high quality and exceptional service, a characteristic that embodies the Outer Reef philosophy and business model,” says Jeff Druek, President and CEO of Outer Reef Yachts.

Boaters in Australia and throughout Europe can expect the same dedicated customer service and level of involvement in the design and construction of their Kadey-Krogen that owners in North America experience.

Kadey-Krogen Yachts currently builds long range Trawler Yachts from 39’ to 58’ in pilothouse and tri-deck configurations. Outer Reef Yachts builds custom long range Motor Yachts from 63’ to 118’ also in raised pilothouse and tri-deck configurations.

For more information visit www.outerreefyachts.com and www.kadeykrogen.com .”

Adapted from press materials provided by the companies.

Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power

Nord Star Offers New 24 Offshore Model with Outboard Power

New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Nord Star USA and Brewer Yacht Sales will be showing a new Nord Star 24 Offshore model from the Finnish boat builder at the New England Boat Show in late February.  The boat features outboard propulsion but retains the salty pilothouse looks of its sister ships in the Nord Star Patrol line that runs all the way up to 40′.

New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Interior Forward View of New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Interior Forward View of New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

The 24 Offshore with outboards features a vee berth forward and seating for up to six in the pilothouse.  I’ve written before about the Nord Star line — I tested both the 26 and 31 — and I think they’re worth a good, long look.  The design and construction are to hardy commercial Finnish workboat standards, and the systems and features are first-rate.  This new outboard version of the 24 will offer a little more mechanical simplicity, as well as below-decks storage, for an owner who prefers an outboard solution, rather than the standard Volvo diesel.

Vee Berth Aboard New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Vee Berth Aboard New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Marine Head Aboard New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Marine Head Aboard New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

I don’t have the specs on the outboard choice(s) yet, but in the images you see with this story, taken from the company website, the boat has been fitted with a sizeable Honda, probably the 225, which is built around a 5.6L V-6.  Maximum recommended horsepower would be around 250, based on the listed 200 kW.  I noticed that the listed beam measurement of 8′ – 9″ means that it would require a special trailer permit in most of the United States, but they’re simple to get and frankly, with a weight of just under 3 tons withOUT the motor, you’re not gonna just drag this around behind your Civic.  It does mean, though, that you can probably store it in the backyard or driveway in the off-season.

Looking Aft from the Cabin Aboard New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Looking Aft from the Cabin Aboard New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

If you can visit Boston in late February, you’ll see this boat at the New England Boat Show.  You can download a basic brochure on the inboard-powered 24 model here

Layout of the New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Layout of the New Nord Star 24 Offshore Outboard Model

Nord Star 24 Offshore
Specifications

IMCI CE-B OFFSHORE  
Total length 7,8m (25’6”)
Total width 2,7m (8’9”)
Hull v-angle (stern) 18,3
Height in main cabin 1,88m (6’2”)
Transportheight (with cradle) 2,95m (9’7”)
Max. recommended nr. of persons 6
Max. recommended
propulsion power
200 kw
TANK SIZE CHART  
Water 50L (13 gal)
Septic 47L (12 gal)
Diesel 240L (63 gal)
LOADING  
Max. recommended loading 600 kg
(1323 lb)
WEIGHTS (avarage)  
Weight (without engine) 1900 kg
(5732 lb)

 

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Powerboats

Dashew Offshore Working on FPB 112 Design

Dashew Offshore FPB 112 starboard profile

Dashew Offshore FPB 112 starboard profile

The Dashew Offshore designs, pioneered by Steve and Linda Dashew’s Wind Horse and the tens of thousands of miles under her keel, have been moving smartly forward recently, with the FPB 64 in production and now, the FPB 112 moving into detailed design and production.  Wind Horse, the FPB 83 that served as the prototype for the FPB line, accumulated more than 25,000 miles of cruising in her first 11 months.

These boats are designed to handle the worst the oceans can deal; not that you would voluntarily seek those conditions, but for the peace-of-mind in knowing you would survive an accidental encounter.  The FPB boats are long and slender, with extremely fine entries that serve to pierce as much as climb head seas, and stern contours designed to make sure they don’t get squirrelly in following seas. And finally, they are self-righting, a unique capability in recreational class powerboats to my knowledge.

Another unique characteristic is the aluminum hulls. They are unpainted and for good reason. Here is Dashew’s take on bare aluminum:

“Let’s look at the advantages of bare aluminum:

  • No maintenance.
  • No worries about rafting against commercial boats.
  • Lighter.
  • Low key work boat look (or, at least it does not look like a conventional yacht).
  • Significantly less capital cost.
  • Minimal costs associated with maintenance.
  • Tolerates “operator error” and can be touched up or cleaned with a four inch grinder.
  • No periodic repainting the topsides.

But what happens if you fall in love with the new boat look and want to keep your FPB shiny? This is easily solved with some young muscle, a bit of scaffolding, and a lot Scotchbrite abrasive pads during haul out. And with the interest earned on the money saved by going bare you can more than pay the yard bill for polishing the topsides.”

Deckhouse Interior of the PFB 83 Wind Horse

Deckhouse Interior of the PFB 83 Wind Horse

The deckhouse design of the FPB series is centered on a concept known as the “360 degree view,” which means that all the main daytime spaces are on a single level surrounded by windows (offshore-rated, of course).  This photo from the Dashew website, illustrates the effect nicely.

If you’re in the market for an expedition yacht that can offer the ultimate in safety design while also giving you a unique take on luxurious accommodations, take some time to explore the FPB series from Dashew Offshore.  The design website and the sister site are chock-full of useful information for cruisers of all kinds, whether or not you’re a potential client.

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC. All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Powerboats