trawlers

P.A.E. Introduces New Nordhavn 52 Coastal Pilot

 

Nordhavn 52 Coastal Pilot Profile -- Image Courtesy of P.A.E.

Nordhavn 52 Coastal Pilot Profile -- Image Courtesy of P.A.E.

 

The builders of the famous Nordhavn brand of ocean-crossing, full-displacement yachts, this week introduced a brand-new design – the 52 Coastal Pilot — that reestablishes a coastal cruising model in the company’s fleet.  The original 35 Coastal Pilot has been discontinued for several years, but Nordhavn admirers continued to clamor for a replacement.

Well, this is a much bigger boat than the 35 CP, but its semi-displacement hull and 8-15 knot cruising speed and lighter weight than a traditional deep-hull Nordhavn may be the sweet spot for potential customers looking for a less ambitious entry into the Nordhavn fleet.

 

Nordhavn 52 Coastal Pilot Layout -- Image Courtesy of P.A.E.

Nordhavn 52 Coastal Pilot Layout -- Image Courtesy of P.A.E.

 

The new 52 Coastal Pilot has a classic sedan configuration with liveaboard-quality owners’ cabin and a second guest stateroom.  A second head with stall shower will service the guest accommodations and double as a day head.

 

Nordhavn 52 Coastal Pilot Deck Layout -- Image Courtesy of P.A.E.

Nordhavn 52 Coastal Pilot Deck Layout -- Image Courtesy of P.A.E.

 

The new boat will have a displacement of about 52,000 pounds, which is nearly the same as the Nordhavn 40, currently the smallest boat in the fleet.  It will be barely half the mass of the current full-displacement N52, however.  Range with 800 gallons of fuel powering twin Cummins QSB 5.9 liter, 480 hp diesels should be about 1,000 miles.  Larger engines, with higher top-end speeds, are also available.  Even though it is designed to be a coastal cruiser, the 52 CP will comply with CE Category A certification for unrestricted offshore recreational use.

True to its liveaboard design target, the 52 CP will have eight 255 amp hour AGM batteries for starting and house needs, along with a 3,500 watt inverter/charger and a 20 kW Onan generator with its own starting batteries.

Here’s a full rundown on the features:

  • Designed to comply with CE Category A certification for unrestricted offshore recreational use
  • Twin Cummins QSB 5.9 liter – 480 hp diesel engines with electronic controls on fly bridge and interior helm station
  • Heavily insulated stand up engine room with molded fiberglass floors and highly detailed overhead and walls with three access points.
  • Engine room fitted with Delta T intake and exhaust blowers with Delta T moisture eliminators
  • 2 Molded fiberglass fuel tanks with gravity supply reservoir for absolute reliability in fuel delivery
  • Two Molded fiberglass water tanks
  • Molded fiberglass holding tank
  • Bennett Premium trim tabs
  • Side Power 11 hp, 24 volt bow thruster
  • Eight 255 amp hour AGM batteries for engine starting and house power
  • 3500 watt inverter/charger
  • 20 KW Onan generator with separate starting batteries
  • Cruisair reverse cycle air-conditioning – heating through out
  • Galley appliances including refrigerator freezer with ice maker, electric cook top and convection microwave
  • Bosch Washer and dryer with separate Uline freezer in basement utility area
  • Imtra LED lighting throughout
  • Muir 3500 lb horizontal electric windlass with 110 lb anchor and 400 feet 3/8” chain
  • Flybridge with fixed stainless steel and fiberglass bimini and LED overhead lighting
  • Steelhead 600-lb. tender crane

General Specifications are as follows:

 

  •        LOA:            52’ 1 ½”
  •        LWL:            48 11 ½”
  •        Draft :           4’ 3 ½”
  •        Beam:          15’ 10”
  •        Displ.            52,000
  •        Water           340 gallons
  •        Fuel              800 gallons
  •        Holding         80 gallons

 

Lots more information is available at the Nordhavn brand website.

Copyright © 2012 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Powerboats

First Nordhavn 63 Performance Data

First Nordhavn 63, named Silver Spray -- Photo by Owner, Courtesy of PAE

First Nordhavn 63, named Silver Spray -- Photo by Owner, Courtesy of PAE

Pacific Asian Enterprises, Inc., yesterday released the first published performance data for the new Nordhavn 63.  The data are from the first hull, Silver Spray, which was just delivered to its owner at PAE’s Stuart, Florida commissioning facility.  As you can see in the accompanying photo above, taken by the yacht’s owner, the N63 truly looks like the “next-generation” N62, the aft-pilothouse trawler that was a customer and fan favorite all through its production run.  PAE has a lot riding on this yacht and it could become the right model to help bring the next generation of luxury distance-cruising boaters to the brand.  It’s large enough to accommodate truly sumptuous appointments, yet small enough to be easily handled by a couple without crew.

The First Nordhavn 63, Silver Spray -- Photo Courtesy of PAE

The First Nordhavn 63, Silver Spray -- Photo Courtesy of PAE

In the table below, you can see that the sweet spot for cruising will be a little more than 8 knots.  The fuel consumption basically doubles from 8.1 knots to 9.30 knots.  And of course, as with nearly every other hull like this, if you slow down you get better range.  Here you can see the NMPG at 7.55 knots is 1.42, which is very good performance for a yacht that displaces about 143,000 lbs.

The N63 hull incorporates an interesting design detail called a “maintenance strake.”  We wrote about it here.

You can download the complete performance data sheet here.

Here is a link to the Nordhavn 63 webpage for full specs and information.

 Nordhavn 63 Cruise Performance Data

RPM KNOTS GPH NMPG % Load
1216 7.55 5.30 1.42 41
1314 8.10 6.70 1.21 48
1597 9.30 12.70 0.73 75
1706 9.50 14.85 0.64 88
1803 9.80 17.05 0.57 100


*Performance based on average of 2 reciprocal-course runs.  Data from Nordhavn 6301, equipped with a single Lugger 1276, and a 5-bladed 42″ x 29.5″ P Hung Shen prop.

Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power

New Nordic Tugs 39 A Nice Update to NT Fleet

New Nordic Tugs 39

New Nordic Tugs 39

In a piece I wrote for YachtWorld.com this week, I said that the new Nordic Tugs 39, an updated replacement for the NT-37, is a worthy successor.  The couple I interviewed in the story, Donna and Kevin Steele, went through a meticulous process that culminated in choosing the new NT-39 and their experience would serve any new boat buyer well.  Have a look at the piece on YachtWorld.com.

Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Powerboats

First Photos: Krogen 52′ Released from Mold

Kadey-Krogen 5201 Released from Hull Mold - Photo Courtesy of Kadey-Krogen

Kadey-Krogen 5201 Released from Hull Mold - Photo Courtesy of Kadey-Krogen

Kadey-Krogen Yachts said today that hull number one of the new Krogen 52′ line has been released from its mold.  Krogen 5201 will be a single engine vessel with hydraulic bow and stern thrusters.  The new yacht is scheduled to be delivered sometime this summer.

Bow View of Kadey-Krogen 5201 Released from Hull Mold -- Photo Courtesy of Kadey-Krogen

Bow View of Kadey-Krogen 5201 Released from Hull Mold -- Photo Courtesy of Kadey-Krogen

There’s a lot to like about this slightly smaller version of the Krogen 58′.  We have written about the new boat before here on OceanLines.  You can see all the photos at the Kadey-Krogen website here.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Construction & Technical, Cruising Under Power, Powerboats

Five Pocket Trawlers for Consideration

Call them pocket-trawlers or mini/pocket-tugs, the North Pacific Yachts 28’ Pilothouse, Nordic Tugs 26, Ranger Tugs 25SC, Minor Offshore 25, and Rosborough RF-246 have hardiness and efficiency in common.

The terms “pocket trawler” and “pocket tug” don’t really have precise definitions, yet both connote a small, salty vessel that’s probably a jack-of-all-trades and won’t break the bank. In that sense, the labels work, and in this article we take a look at five popular pocket trawlers to consider if you’re looking for a capable small cruiser under 30 feet.

—–
Editor’s Note — This is a preview of a longer piece I wrote for Yachtworld.com.  I write a monthly boat review for Yachtworld/Boats.com.  The sites have a large, and growing collection of features, mostly written by dedicated marine journalists (like me!).  The full article at Yachtworld has more detail about the boats, specs, prices and photos.
—–

Nordic Tugs 26

The rejuvenation of Nordic Tugs 26production three years ago was cause for celebration among the Nordic Tugs faithful. First introduced more than 30 years ago and withdrawn in 1997, its 2011 incarnation features a smart Cummins QSD 115-hp diesel and has a range of about 150 NM on its 75 gallons of fuel, cruising at 8 knots. Top speed is about 14 knots.

North Pacific Yachts 28 Pilothouse

The North Pacific Yachts 28is the smallest boat in the company’s lineup, and it carries on the philosophy of providing maximum value for the dollar. Built from a new hull design by Karl Stambaugh at an experienced yard in China and well-equipped right off the delivery ship, a new 28 will run you about $177,500. The only thing you need to add to that base configuration is electronics. The boat comes standard with a single 150-hp Cummins QSD diesel, bow thruster, windlass with anchor, chain, and rope rode, raw water washdown, teak and holly floor and hand-rubbed teak paneling and cabinetry. All the sliding windows have screens, and curtains are even provided.

Ranger Tugs 25SC

In 2010, Ranger Tugs modified the design of its popular 25SCto increase the size of the cockpit (“Sport Cockpit”), but taking some room out of the deckhouse. It was a good idea because it makes the cockpit truly useful now and ensures good access to the standard Yanmar 150 -hp diesel. The R25 has always been one of the most popular of the Ranger Tugs line. Its classic “tiny tug” lines draw visitors at the dock, and the company insists on a high level of standard equipment.

Minor Offshore 25

Finland has a generations-old tradition of producing hardy, all-weather and all-season cruising boats. Two of these brands are now available in the United States; the Nord Star line and Minor Offshore boats. (See our recent reviews of the Nord Star 26 and the Nord Star 31.) For this roundup we chose the new Minor Offshore 25.

The Minor Offshore brand is imported to the U.S. by Skarne Marine, in Milford, CT. The look of these boats isn’t so much tugboat as it is military or government patrol boat. In fact, many are sold for just those purposes. But they work as a great all-weather cruising boat for a couple or a small family, too. The 25 has a fully enclosed pilothouse, wide sidedecks, a decently sized cockpit, and a huge swim platform.

Rosborough RF-246

Rosborough is a family company, headquartered in Halifax, Nova Scotia, that builds a feature-packed cruiser for the rough North Atlantic waters that the company’s government and military customers operate in. Interestingly, Roseborough’s RF-246 sedan-style cruiser (also available in a Custom Wheelhouse configuration) can be powered by either outboards or a sterndrive. The hull features a full-length 9” keel for directional stability. The beam is 8’ 6” and the overall length is 25’.

To see all the specs, more details about the boats, as well as some photos, see my original piece on Yachtworld here.

Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Powerboats

The 50th Krogen 48′ Heralds an Ergonomic Makeover

View of the galley and salon of the Krogen 48' AE

View of the galley and salon of the Krogen 48' AE

Kadey-Krogen Yachts said yesterday that the 50th edition of its highly successful 48′ North Sea line is the first to sport a series of now-standard modifications that significantly improve liveability aboard a boat that was already highly regarded in the liveaboard community.  The company took the opportunity to re-badge the boat as the “Krogen 48′ AE,” the AE short for “Advanced Ergonomics.”  The changes include updates to the layouts of the salon, pilothouse and flybridge, as well as the incorporation of home-sized stairs and bannisters to ease movement through the boat.

I would like to tease the good-natured Larry Polster, Kadey-Krogen’s vice president, about how “Advanced” these ergonomic changes really are, but the truth is, in the cruising world they ARE advanced.  Not surprisingly, Kadey-Krogen collected the input from its customers to focus these updates on liveability — that somewhat undefined quality of making a boat easy to live aboard.

The Krogen 48′ North Sea has always been a favorite of long-distance cruisers, passagemakers and liveaboards.  The size seems to be a particular sweet spot for couples who want to live aboard and the boat holds its value extremely well.  A quick survey of Krogen 48′ models for sale on Yachtworld has even ten-year-old boats still well over the $700K mark, which means they really haven’t lost any value at all.

Back to the changes incorporated in the Krogen 48′ AE.  Here’s a brief list:

  • An option for an L- or U-shaped settee along the starboard side of the salon
  • A table that both expands and raises and lowers to serve as coffee table and dining table for eight.
  • A larger galley forward to starboard, with a now-standard Viking four-burner range, household size fridge/freezer, convection microwave, and room for both a trash compactor and dishwasher.
  • A nearly floor-to-ceiling pantry opposite the galley, on the port side.
  • New, deep and wide steps steps up to the pilothouse, with a sturdy bannister for security.
  • A redesigned pilothouse that accommodates side-by-side helm chairs and a larger electronics console (hooray!!).
  • New molded steps outside the portside pilothouse door up to the boat deck and flybridge.
  • Boat deck will accommodate both a 13-foot tender, as well as a summer kitchen.
  • The flybridge helm is now off to starboard, with an L-shape settee to port.

Kadey-Krogen is going through some of its other models just coming intro production now and making some of these same ergonomic changes, particularly to steps and stairs.  Does this kind of change exact a price in terms of space utilization? Of course. But the 48′ is big enough to handle the changes and the improvements in “liveability” are absolutely worth the price. If you’re going to live aboard one of these boats, the convenience and safety of actual human-sized stair treads and risers is more of a big deal than you might think.

For more pictures of the changes involved, check out the November blog entry of the Kadey-Krogen marketing team.  You can get a good feel for the new helm and flybridge arrangement in the pictures there.  You can check out the Krogen 48′ AE at Trawler Fest in Fort Lauderdale at the Bahia Mar January 27-29, and at the Miami International Boat Show (Sea Isle Marina location), from Febryary 17-21.

Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Powerboats

Outer Reef to Represent Kadey-Krogen Internationally

Kadey-Krogen Company Logo

Kadey-Krogen Company Logo

Outer Reef Yachts Company Logo

Outer Reef Yachts Company Logo

Apparently Kadey-Krogen had visions of international sugar plums dancing in its corporate head this holiday season, because today they announced with Outer Reef an agreement to have OR represent Kadey-Krogen through all of OR’s “established international sales and service locations.”

I’ll probably have more information over the next few weeks, but it’s clear the companies see the venture as non-competitive because of the size range of the two product lines — Kadey-Krogen mostly below 60′ (except the 64′ Expedition, which isn’t here yet), and Outer Reef mostly above 60′ (except for the 58′ motoryacht).

Here’s the copy from the release.

“With Outer Reef offices and service centers in Sydney, Australia, and seven locations throughout Europe, Kadey-Krogen is poised to hit the ground running as we launch into the international market. Partnering with a company with an established international sales and service network made good business sense for us, but it was even more important to find a company like Outer Reef that shares our vision of customer service,” says John Gear, President of Kadey-Krogen Yachts.

“We see the representation of Kadey-Krogen Yachts as a great opportunity to offer a very high quality product to our international clientele in the under 60’ range, a size range that Outer Reef Yachts currently does not offer. Kadey-Krogen is synonymous with high quality and exceptional service, a characteristic that embodies the Outer Reef philosophy and business model,” says Jeff Druek, President and CEO of Outer Reef Yachts.

Boaters in Australia and throughout Europe can expect the same dedicated customer service and level of involvement in the design and construction of their Kadey-Krogen that owners in North America experience.

Kadey-Krogen Yachts currently builds long range Trawler Yachts from 39’ to 58’ in pilothouse and tri-deck configurations. Outer Reef Yachts builds custom long range Motor Yachts from 63’ to 118’ also in raised pilothouse and tri-deck configurations.

For more information visit www.outerreefyachts.com and www.kadeykrogen.com .”

Adapted from press materials provided by the companies.

Copyright © 2011 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power

2011 Ranger Tugs Rendezvous Set for Sept. 9-11

Ranger Tugs Gather at a Recent Rendezvous in Bremerton, Washington

Ranger Tugs Gather at a Recent Rendezvous in Bremerton, Washington

Following a successful 2010 owners’ rendezvous in Bremerton, Washington, this past September, Ranger Tugs has announced that the 2011 edition will take place September 9-11, 2011, again in Bremerton, at the Port of Bremerton Marina. Some 42 Ranger Tugs attended the fleet gathering this year, up a third over the previous year.  Ranger Tugs are among the most popular smaller cruising boats and we’ve written extensively about them here on OceanLines.

David and Maureen Baker, owners of the Ranger 29 Karma, served as the event’s volunteer organizers this year, and helped convince owners and enthusiasts from as far away as Virginia to attend.  Several Ranger Tugs owners trailered their boats to the area and launched locally for the cruise to Bremerton. In addition to the typical social events, organizers hosted MER Equipment, an area Yanmar dealer and service center, for a demonstration of some basic maintenance techniques on the Yanmar diesels that power Ranger Tugs.

Organizers hope to continue to grow the Northwest-based event, and more information about it is available on the owners’ website, TugNuts. As of this writing, there have been approximately 1,000 Ranger Tugs delivered.

While some East Coast owners will travel to the factory-sponsored event in Washington, northeast dealer Wilde Yacht Sales in Essex, Connecticut, plans a regional rendezvous in Essex.  We will publish more information on that event separately here on OceanLines.

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Destinations, Powerboats

Nordic Tugs Production Re-Starting

Starboard running shot of the new Nordic Tugs 39

Starboard running shot of the new Nordic Tugs 39

News this week from Nordic Tugs, Inc., that it has re-started production after a three-month hiatus during which most of the operational employees were laid off.  Bob Shamek, who heads sales and marketing for Nordic Tugs, said workers were being recalled as the production processes ramp up.

View of the pilothouse and expanded helm of the new Nordic Tugs 39

View of the pilothouse and expanded helm of the new Nordic Tugs 39

The company has a number of boats on order from its dealer network, including some for its newest model, the NT-39, photos of which are shown in this piece.  The Nordic Tugs line now includes the 26, 34, 39, 42, 49 and 54.

Salon aboard the new Nordic Tugs 39

Salon aboard the new Nordic Tugs 39

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC.  All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Industry News, Powerboats

Dashew Offshore Working on FPB 112 Design

Dashew Offshore FPB 112 starboard profile

Dashew Offshore FPB 112 starboard profile

The Dashew Offshore designs, pioneered by Steve and Linda Dashew’s Wind Horse and the tens of thousands of miles under her keel, have been moving smartly forward recently, with the FPB 64 in production and now, the FPB 112 moving into detailed design and production.  Wind Horse, the FPB 83 that served as the prototype for the FPB line, accumulated more than 25,000 miles of cruising in her first 11 months.

These boats are designed to handle the worst the oceans can deal; not that you would voluntarily seek those conditions, but for the peace-of-mind in knowing you would survive an accidental encounter.  The FPB boats are long and slender, with extremely fine entries that serve to pierce as much as climb head seas, and stern contours designed to make sure they don’t get squirrelly in following seas. And finally, they are self-righting, a unique capability in recreational class powerboats to my knowledge.

Another unique characteristic is the aluminum hulls. They are unpainted and for good reason. Here is Dashew’s take on bare aluminum:

“Let’s look at the advantages of bare aluminum:

  • No maintenance.
  • No worries about rafting against commercial boats.
  • Lighter.
  • Low key work boat look (or, at least it does not look like a conventional yacht).
  • Significantly less capital cost.
  • Minimal costs associated with maintenance.
  • Tolerates “operator error” and can be touched up or cleaned with a four inch grinder.
  • No periodic repainting the topsides.

But what happens if you fall in love with the new boat look and want to keep your FPB shiny? This is easily solved with some young muscle, a bit of scaffolding, and a lot Scotchbrite abrasive pads during haul out. And with the interest earned on the money saved by going bare you can more than pay the yard bill for polishing the topsides.”

Deckhouse Interior of the PFB 83 Wind Horse

Deckhouse Interior of the PFB 83 Wind Horse

The deckhouse design of the FPB series is centered on a concept known as the “360 degree view,” which means that all the main daytime spaces are on a single level surrounded by windows (offshore-rated, of course).  This photo from the Dashew website, illustrates the effect nicely.

If you’re in the market for an expedition yacht that can offer the ultimate in safety design while also giving you a unique take on luxurious accommodations, take some time to explore the FPB series from Dashew Offshore.  The design website and the sister site are chock-full of useful information for cruisers of all kinds, whether or not you’re a potential client.

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC. All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Powerboats

Sushi Run Boats Prepare for 2010 Continuation

Original 2009 Route Map of the GSSR - Courtesy Ken Williams

Original 2009 Route Map of the GSSR - Courtesy Ken Williams

Ken Williams, who, with his wife Roberta, owns the Nordhavn 68 Sans Souci, reports that the 2010 cruising season for the boats of the Great Siberian Sushi Run (GSSR) is approaching. In an email today to followers of his blog, Williams reports that the boats, which traveled from Seattle, Washington to Osaka Japan last year, will this year explore more of Japan and finish in Hong Kong. You can read our coverage of the start of the GSSR last year here.

Williams says, remarkably, that the 2,000 mile voyage will likely include only one overnight passage — that from Taiwan to Hong Kong.  Here’s a quick summary of the trip from Williams’ e-mail:

2010 Route Plan of the GSSR From Osaka to Hong Kong -- Courtesy of Ken Williams

2010 Route Plan of the GSSR From Osaka to Hong Kong -- Courtesy of Ken Williams

“Our journey this year “should” be much easier than last year. We’ll be traveling from Osaka Japan, into Japan’s inland sea, where we’ll visit Hiroshima and Fukuoka. Somewhere along the way we’ll visit South Korea, but we won’t be taking the boats. It’s too complicated, and expensive, to clear the boats out of Japan, into South Korea, and then back into Japan. Instead, we’ll park the boats somewhere and take a ferry into South Korea. Once back on the boats we’ll explore Nagasaki and Kyushu Japan, then head south along the Ryukyu Island Japan, visiting Okinawa along the way. Allegedly the Ryukyu islands are a chain of tropical islands, reminiscent of Hawaii. We’ll then leave Japan from the island of Ishigaki and head to Taiwan, where we’ll visit the factory where our Nordhavn boats were born. Our group will be the first Nordhavns to ever return to the factory, so everyone is very excited. After that we’ll head to Hong Kong.”

To read more about the run, including who else will be in the group this year, you can read Ken Williams’ blog here. And if you haven’t already picked up his books on cruising, you should. They’re a great mix of journal-like entries with a narrative that let’s you share his learning experiences along the way. We have a link to the online store where you can order them over on the right sidebar (that link is not a paid ad; it’s there because I like Ken’s writing and hope to expand his readership even farther).

Copyright © 2010 by OceanLines LLC. All rights reserved.

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Destinations, Maintenance & DIY, Passagemaking News, People, Powerboats, seamanship

Fleming Enthusiasts Get Their Own Magazine

Fleming's Venture Magazine Cover Page

Fleming's Venture Magazine Cover Page

Fleming Yachts  has published the first edition of a company-sponsored magazine featuring the brand’s yachts, cruising articles and technical stories.  The Fall/Winter edition of Venturer is available online at the Fleming website.  Readers familiar with Nordhavn’s Circumnavigator magazine will find Venturer an opportunity to get the same kind of detailed product and “real world” use information.
Fleming 55 Pilothouse Motoryacht

Fleming 55 Pilothouse Motoryacht

The first edition includes stories of company founder Tony Fleming’s “Down East” circumnavigation, which took him and his Fleming 65 up the Hudson River to the Erie Canal to the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence River and Seaway and down the northeast coast.  There is a detailed article on fuel system design from contributor Steve D’Antonio, technical specialist familiar to readers of Passagemaker magazine.

Fleming currently offers three models — the 55, 65 and 75.  They are all twin-engine, semi-displacement boats designed to cruise most efficiently, according to Fleming, at 9-10 knots, but also capable of cruising at up to 18 knots.  The hulls feature a sharp entry with flatter sections and hard chines aft for lift at speed and less roll at anchor than a round-bilge, full-displacement hull.

The boats are all relatively low-profile, full pilothouse designs intended to take a couple on long-distance cruises. 

Copyright © 2009 OceanLines LLC

Posted by Tom in Boats, Cruising Under Power, Destinations, Engines, Industry News, Maintenance & DIY, Passagemaking News, People, People & Profiles, Powerboats, seamanship, Technology